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View Full Version : s/o of jobs without a degree thread...



Dawn Gilmore
09-05-2012, 09:49 AM
How about jobs that require only a 2 year degree? Community colleges are far less costly than the typical university, and because they have a lot of adult students, they tend to offer evening classes, to allow students to work a regular job, and go to classes in the evening.

I can think of a few...

Nursing (an associates degree in nursing will allow you test for the RN license, and then once you are working at a hospital, if you want to continue on to a bachelor's in nursing, the hospital will usually help you pay for it, or at least a portion of the expense... I think the hospital I currently work at will pay $5000/year towards education expenses for nurses.)

X-ray Technician (dh is finishing up his prerequisites to apply to this program next spring! Though depending on where you live, the schools can be scarce. We looked into this program for dh when we lived in Michigan. There were only 2 schools in the state, the closest was 3-4 hours from us, and had a 4 year waiting list once you had been accepted! :eek: We were thrilled to find a program right in our town, when we moved here to Virginia!)

Sonography Technician (dh's school also offers this program, I don't know much about it, though.)

(Both of these have a pretty good starting wage... ~$50-60K to start, depending on location, it may be slightly higher or lower, but that range would probably be pretty average.)

Dawn Gilmore
09-05-2012, 11:27 AM
Another thought I had, was that getting a license to be a CNA is a good stepping stone into nursing. You can work as a Nurse's Aide (or Patient Care Technician, as most hospitals are calling them now) and the hospital would pay for you to go to school to work on that Associates degree or Bachelors degree in Nursing... The CNA program is typically less than a year long.

Gail in NY
09-05-2012, 12:22 PM
hmmm......this is good info to tuck away.......

Steph
09-05-2012, 12:44 PM
My oldest is interested in architecture but is also looking into CAD (computer aided drafting) which is usually a 2 year degree either at CC or tech school.

My dh is finishing his bachelor's degree online now and it is so much harder with a family and a full time job. I really don't care what my boys get a degree in but I will be fairly insistent that they get something.
When the company my dh worked for closed, it was really difficult for him to get a job without a degree. Even w/ all his years of experience, it didn't matter as much to an employer as that piece of paper.

Gitel in nj
09-05-2012, 01:43 PM
My oldest is interested in architecture but is also looking into CAD (computer aided drafting) which is usually a 2 year degree either at CC or tech school.

My dh is finishing his bachelor's degree online now and it is so much harder with a family and a full time job. I really don't care what my boys get a degree in but I will be fairly insistent that they get something.
When the company my dh worked for closed, it was really difficult for him to get a job without a degree. Even w/ all his years of experience, it didn't matter as much to an employer as that piece of paper.

Steph, I am an architect, as you are well aware (I'm sure) becoming an Architect requires either a 5 year B.ARCH or a 4 year degree + M.ARCH Plus 2-3 years apprenticeship and sitting for and passing the test (which is over the course of several days)

CAD as you say is much less rigorous, however, most Architecture Firms that I am aware of (at least here in the NE) don't really want a CAD operator. They want someone with the ARchitecture degree who can do CAD work. And they all can, plus REVIT too.

I would imagine that someone who just knows CAD can work in other technical capacities, CAD is used in many technical industries--but I am not sure they will find work in an ARchitect's office, and if they do, I don't think the opportunity to advance is very high. Not to mention, that Architecture is a notoriously poor paying profession with layoffs constantly....I have many unemployed licensed Architect Friends :(

Just want to be real here...

Steph
09-05-2012, 03:37 PM
Thanks Gitel. The reason Caleb is looking into CAD, is for the reasons you stated. High unemployment doesn't sound good after several years of college. He's just not sure it's worth the time and money it would take for a degree in architecture.

I'm really not even sure he'll end up doing CAD. I just mentioned it to him as another option. He loves drafting and has always been interested in building/structures. I appreciate your point of view. I'll show him your post this evening.

BTW, I actually pm'd you several months ago to ask you about architecture but your box was full. Funny, huh?

Anjie in PA
09-06-2012, 12:56 AM
My older daughter, Laura, is planning to get her associates' in radiology tech. There are TONS of jobs in the medical field that require an associates', as I've found out during our school search. Dawn listed some; surgical tech is another good one. Another one that I can think of, and we've also looked into, is ASL interpreter. This one can be very difficult to find, though!

Melinda in KY
09-06-2012, 10:49 AM
Our daughter graduated from homeschool last year(2011). She had considered nursing, so I encouraged her to take the CNA course offered at the local community college her last semester of her senior year. It was a good choice, it gave her a peek into the nursing field, as well as a requirement if she decides later to continue in nursing. She also experienced being in class with diverse people and another teacher besides mom:lol:. She did great and passed her state certification:clap:. However, she is not pursuing nursing at this time, she is doing cosmetology and will be finished in Feb. or March. The medical field is still in the back of her mind;) and I think she has gained the confidence to do what she puts her mind to:hcry:.

Heather (WI)
09-06-2012, 05:43 PM
I have an Associate's Degree as an Occupational Therapy Assistant (and there is an equivalent one for Physical Therapy).

AND, I am going back for another Associate Degree in Dental Hygiene now! (I started it before I got pregnant with our dd and never knew that God would have me homeschool all these years, but I'm planning to finish my degree just around the time (or a little after) our dd finishes homeschool high school. It's usually a 2-year degree, but our technical college offers it part-time over 3 years.

Marsha in Fl
09-08-2012, 04:26 PM
YAY Heather!!:clap:

I recommend Dental Hygiene. Most states it is a 2 yr degree Associate of Science, but there are some 4 yr degree schools around. Starting salary in this part of Florida is around $30 or more an hour. Good enough to support yourself and children if you had to.;)

I started out going to business school for dental assisting and worked in that area for 10 years before going back for hygiene. My 2 year degree took me 4 years to complete :D but I had to work part time all the way thru.;)

One major negative is most dental offices are small and don't offer health insurance.

Heather (WI)
09-08-2012, 07:44 PM
YAY Heather!!:clap:

I recommend Dental Hygiene. Most states it is a 2 yr degree Associate of Science, but there are some 4 yr degree schools around. Starting salary in this part of Florida is around $30 or more an hour. Good enough to support yourself and children if you had to.;)

I started out going to business school for dental assisting and worked in that area for 10 years before going back for hygiene. My 2 year degree took me 4 years to complete :D but I had to work part time all the way thru.;)

One major negative is most dental offices are small and don't offer health insurance.

Marcia, that is SO cool!! :thumb: Dental is something I've wanted to do since high school, and it was kind of my mom that steered me away from it (saying things like it was gross to work in peoples' mouths). Kind of ironic, since I went into Occupational Therapy and had to do a lot of nursing tasks that were WAY worse than working in peoples' mouths, LOL! :lol:

Anyway, I'm on the waiting list right now, and I can take the science classes (Biochemistry, Microbiology, etc.) while waiting to get in. Thankfully, several of my general ed. credits from OT transfer to my hygiene degree, so I have about 15 of the 70 credits done before I even start!

I just finished CPR again a few months ago (since my certification had lapsed). Now, I just wait for them to let me start registering for classes. I'm glad that it's a part-time (or more like 3/4 time, but I have some of it done), since I'm still homeschooling our daughter for the next 3 years. It should work out (God-willing) that I finish my hygiene degree around or shortly after we finish homeschooling. :clap:

Donna in MO
09-10-2012, 08:01 PM
You can get a Physical Therapy degree in two years?

Heather (WI)
09-10-2012, 10:47 PM
You can get a Physical Therapy degree in two years?

No, Physical Therapist Assistant. (I was an Occupational Therapist Assistant--the degree equivalent of a PTA.)

WendyW
09-11-2012, 08:02 PM
This website (http://www.mikeroweworks.com/) by Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs may interest you. It's all about encouraging non-college skilled labor.

Nancy Ann
09-11-2012, 10:42 PM
I have an Associates Degree in Health Information. There are lots of great medical jobs you can get with this degree that does not work directly with patients. I know that may sound horrible but the stress of working with sick people really got to me. I was a nurse assistant for several years and I just couldn't deal with it anymore. So, I looked into Health Information and it was really interesting. You can do coding which actually pays really well and you can even work from home. There are lots of other jobs in the medical industry for health information and if later you want to extend your degree you can go back to school for 2 or 3 years more and become a manager health information.

This job also has day hours and weekend off which is another reason I chose it.