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View Full Version : What do your kids say about FIAR?



lizbeth
01-18-2013, 11:11 PM
I know how many moms LOVE FIAR, BYFIAR, and even A & B FIAR. Me included! :clap: But, for the families who have children who are done with FIAR and especially those who used Beyond, what do your now grown (or almost grown ;)) children say about their education with FIAR? I just know that my kids and I don't always share the same point of view (especially with the idea of the necessity of school :lol:).

So how do your children feel about the educational choice you made for them? :D

Marcia
01-19-2013, 02:26 PM
They appreciate what it has done for them. They can see how it has helped them be independent and critical thinkers. They truly do love to learn. It sounds so corny, but it really did give them a love for learning. :hcry:

Susan Seaman
01-19-2013, 02:41 PM
My oldest has great memories of FIAR and begged me to keep everything so that she could use it with her kids. The memories my boys have are not as extensive, but they do bring them up from time to time.

None of my kids truly love school - which they consider work. Interestingly, they never considered FIAR as school for that reason. It was too much fun to be school in their opinion.

The subject they feel that way about now is read-alouds and discussion-based learning. They never complain about spending time doing that and don't even consider it "school." "School" is doing math and writing papers and such.

I used to cringe when folks would ask my kids if they liked school. They always said they didn't, and it was hard not to take it personally.

My oldest three have all shown a love for learning - my oldest is interesting in learning all kinds of things, my son Nathan is interested in learning military history, and my son Caleb has taught himself to play several instruments quite well. But if you asked them, they wouldn't say that they love learning (except for the oldest, because she has figured out that she does). It's more subtle with the others.

Gail in NY
01-19-2013, 06:27 PM
my kids loved their fiar years. It has truly changed how we look at things as a family.. It isnt just the books, but the whole philosophy and relationships. My dc love the fiar books and I am not allowed to get rid of any! My dil will be starting next year with my dgd! Just think! 2nd generation rowers! My dc loved it and say it was the best!

Awww...sniff, sniff....I am making myself all nostalgic.......:hcry:

lizbeth
01-19-2013, 07:26 PM
my kids loved their fiar years. It has truly changed how we look at things as a family.. It isnt just the books, but the whole philosophy and relationships. My dc love the fiar books and I am not allowed to get rid of any! My dil will be starting next year with my dgd! Just think! 2nd generation rowers! My dc loved it and say it was the best!

Awww...sniff, sniff....I am making myself all nostalgic.......:hcry:

awww....:group: :)

shonda in ca
01-19-2013, 09:56 PM
When my now 17dd was 13yo she told me to "just stick with Five in a Row for M-7 because I learned a lot ."

She took the skill of researching topically that she learned with Fiar (we call them rabbit trails, generally) and has had a great education.

I credit Fiar and the Lamberts for teaching me how to teach in a way that would inspire learning and build relationships.

I'm sorry to say my boys didn't have as much Fiar when they were at those critical ages. They both had a lot of "therapy school" with occupational therapy, speech therapy and other appointments and that was their school for about 2 years. It could just be different personalities, but I can't help think they didn't have the same 5 in a row experience as their sisters, and it shows.

Gail in NY
01-19-2013, 10:19 PM
I credit Fiar and the Lamberts for teaching me how to teach in a way that would inspire learning and build relationships.
:yes:

Nancy Ann
01-21-2013, 07:28 PM
For us it wouldn't have really mattered what we used. My son mostly looks back and is fond of the time we spent together and him being able to be home. He actually feels bad for his friends who have to go to school, he feels incredibly lucky to be homeschooled.

My son is a 5th grader this year and his little sister is soon to be 4. He has started to talk about what sort of things he would like to do to help with her education and he is starting to remember and think about the stuff he did. He remembers lots of things but mostly he remembers books we read and activities we did together.

The best memories for him are ones that include lots of laughing. Even now some of our happiest moments come from phonics/spelling. He told me just the other day that he really enjoyed doing phonics/spelling because we are always laughing about the words. When we talk about words or I am giving him a test I make up sentences and I try to make them as ridiculous as possible! Sometimes he is laughing so hard it ends up being really hard to get back to work!

So, I cannot say at this point that my son has an opinion about what curriculum he has liked the best. I just know that he really enjoys being homeschooled and the time we spend together.

ETA: I don't mean to say all this to somehow discredit FIAR or minimize it. I only say this because when I see threads and posts like this I am never sure what to think because we haven't had that sort of experience. I cannot in all honestly credit FIAR for certain things about my son's education. I know for certain homeschooling has been amazing for us and all the work and worry is worth it. But, to separate it all out and say that FIAR did this..I am just not able to say with all certainty. We have done so many great things and have had so many struggles that we worked through. I think FIAR was a wonderful choice for us and I look forward to using it with my daughter. So far homeschooling has been a terrific journey and I hope one that God will continue to bless us with a long time to come.

Rebe
01-21-2013, 11:06 PM
I think each of my dc who have finished FIAR and/or BY have gotten something different out it. I don't know if they would or could articulate this, but I think I have a pretty good idea of how they responded to it.

My oldest -- it allowed him to explore topics with intensity and direction. He was a very intense, focused child. Very precise and artistic (he loved making lapbooks one year, but only one year). He never tired of reading the books and getting something new to do every single day. He loved the "pattern" we had each week of studying all the different books. He knew what to expect and yet it was still new and interesting each time.

My dd loved the stories. She loved learning about people and thinking about why they did certain things. She was always jumping in with the answers when I'd say "why did so-and-so do this" and my ds would look at me blankly -- she would always know the character's motivation. She was up for any lesson, no matter what it was. She didn't like cooking :lol: , but everything else, yes. She also learned how to do a unit study and is now loving A&BY as an independent project.

My middle ds loved the closeness. He would snuggle with me (and still does, sometimes!) to read the stories over and over. He never tired of that, just cuddling up on the couch and reading together. He loved the experiments and the "doing," too, including the cooking. :) I think more than any of my dc, I can tell that FIAR and BY are his very favorite thing to do in school.

It was fun to think about this question. I'm glad you asked it! :yes:

LeanneNZ
01-23-2013, 03:23 AM
Fiar was by far the best curriculum we used - it gave a good grounding for our family re schooling. We used Before, fiar, beyond, above and beyond, cooking book, holiday, and nature studies. If I had my time over again I would use FIAR.

Both the kids remember fondly the FIAR days - but we kept it pretty Charlotte Mason style (book work am out side activities in afternoon). It took a lot of courage on my part to follow Jane's lesson plans rather than beef them up all the time. BUT it worked and gave the kids time to learn, and digest what we had covered.

I asked the kids what they thought - dd (19) loved FIAR and remembers a lot of the stories and lessons we rowed. DS(16) 3 years younger not as much except vol 4. I am wondering if this is due to the age difference and dd always sat and listened again to the stories when ds rowed the books.

Now the kids are older I am moving on some of the books that the kids didn't treasure and giving other families the opportunity to also use the books. (I loved collecting them over the years but in a minimalist phase so being a tad ruthless - Hope I don;t regret it GULP)
Love Leanne NZ

Luisa
01-23-2013, 01:59 PM
We moved around a bit (with regards to curriculum) this past year. We had previously used B4FIAR, FIAR, and BYFIAR. Not sure at this point WHY we decided to give something else a try, but we did. We just recently came back to FIAR and BYFIAR and it was like "coming home" for all of us. We missed it dearly and don't plan on leaving it anytime soon!!!

Merrilee Morse
01-24-2013, 07:49 PM
My boys never enjoyed school so much as when we were doing FIAR. I have told the story before of my adult son Patrick (and my first that I homeschooled) coming for a visit and finding the FIAR manuals on the coffee table. He flipped through it and cried out, "Why couldn't we have had this when I was homeschooling?!" I felt so bad for him.

lizbeth
01-26-2013, 04:45 PM
I love hearing all these stories and thoughts! More, more! :)