PDA

View Full Version : High school history?



Tricia O
02-18-2013, 07:25 AM
What do you use for high school history?
How teacher intensive is it?
How much writing does your student have to do in history?

These are the graduation requirements put out by our state:
1 World History
1 U.S. History
Geography
U.S. Government
Economics
Mississippi Studies

I am actually glad Mississippi Studies is on there, because we haven't done this yet at all. What did you use for State History? What did you (or do you plan to) use for the rest of the histories listed above?

Is there a better order/grade in which to do these?

Thanks so much for holding my hand through all of this!

Heather W
02-18-2013, 08:37 AM
WinterPromise is a nice history program and has credits in world and american history. We've used Quest for the Middle Ages. Think of WP as a cross between unit studies and a lit based program like sonlight.

This year I've made up my own course called Foundations of American Democracy which consists of reading huge books on the Founding Fathers and discussing their contents in addition to writing about what we've read- analyzing and making arguments for assertions based on the assignments I give him and what he's been reading. It's been interesting. :lol: It's been eye opening to experience the detail with which a historian will write on one topic! :lol:

Currently, he's reading George Washington's Sacred Fire and the entire tome is about refuting the argument that GW was a deist. He just finished a fifty page chapter on how GW prayed at Valley Forge. :lol:

At the end of the year he'll have one credit in world history and another in US history. I'm not sure what we'll do next year yet. He'll be a sophomore. I'm giving him one World History credit from 8th grade because winter promise is solid work. It'll get reported at the end of 9th just like his algebra I from last year.

wende
02-18-2013, 08:38 AM
We do history chronologically
9th - Ancients (MOH 1, plus a book list)
10th - Middle Ages and Ren/Ref (MOH2 and/or SOTW2, plus a book list)
11th - World Modern to Reconstruction (unsure)
12th - World Modern Reconstruction - present (unsure)

As far as credits go:
World History would be covered in 9th - 12th (so we'll do .25 credit a year for a total of 1 credit)
American History would start in Ren/Ref and continue through 11th and 12th (much more than 1 credit)
State History will be covered as a unit within the modern History year.
Economics and US Government will be interspersed throughout all the years using Maybury's books (.25 credit a year for a total of 1 credit)
World Geography is also interspersed throughout all 4 years

Marcia
02-18-2013, 09:33 AM
Tricia,
I used Notgrass History for World, United States, and Government/Economics. State and Geography are not high school requirements here in California, so we covered them in junior high school.

http://www.notgrass.com/notgrass/homeschool-curriculum-high-school/

Rebe
02-18-2013, 09:42 AM
We use Notgrass for U.S., World, and Amer. Gov't. We may use it for Econ, as well.

Ds and I created our own state history course made up of 8 2-week units, which he's doing right now. If you want me to post it, let me know.

For geography, there was a recent thread here on high school geography programs.

Susan Seaman
02-18-2013, 09:54 AM
Heather, do they have to do lots of writing with Winter Promise? Or simply reading and discussing? Are there projects? I looked at their website, and I couldn't find any samples, so I'm not sure if it's just a reading schedule.

Joy in Alabama
02-18-2013, 10:20 AM
World History/US History: TruthQuest
Geo: Around the World in 180 Days
Gov/Ec: Clarence Carson and the whole Uncle Eric series, but kinda thinking about Notgrass
State History: We are not required to have it so I do Southern history instead in the midst of US/world history, which I spread out over 9/10/11th
I usually do geography during 7th/8th grade and go ahead and give a credit for it.

Becky in CA
02-18-2013, 10:33 AM
We are HUGE fans of ACE for history (and science). :thumb: There are samples of paces at CBD.

Nancy Ann
02-18-2013, 10:44 AM
We use Sonlight. We are not in the highschool arena yet.

Sonlight Core 100 is for U.S history. It is suppose to be quite challenging and a lot of meat. I like how with Sonlight you also get literature and geography. You may have to ask on the Sonlight boards but I believe with a Sonlight Core you can give a credit for literature studies as well. They have writing assignments. Also, I believe you can count a geography credit as well. Not sure how many Cores will give you a geography credit. But you learn geography along with your studies. I like how all of this is combined.

Sonlight Core 200 is a world history core that has a Christian emphasis. I have not used it yet but am really looking forward to that! It may be more church history than world history, so that may be something to consider.

I would recommend Core W for a 9th grader. It is a basic world history course. It is on the lighter side so using it for anything higher than 9th grade may not work.

If you decide to go with Sonlight I recommend calling Sonlight and talking to them about using Core W for a 9th grader and/or asking them how much world history is taught with Core 200. Also asking them how much of a credit can you give for literature and geography with the cores.

Core 400 is a government core. It is quite extensive. It is more than a 1/2 credit I am sure, but again if you interested in Sonlight I recommend calling them and asking them how to apply credits.

Sonlight also has an economics core.

ETA: Many moms have stated that the high school cores are not very teacher intensive. Many students are following the schedule and doing assignments on their own.

Heather W
02-18-2013, 11:20 AM
Heather, do they have to do lots of writing with Winter Promise? Or simply reading and discussing? Are there projects? I looked at their website, and I couldn't find any samples, so I'm not sure if it's just a reading schedule.

Some writing assignments, a LOT of reading, maps, projects, the works.

Miranda.in.WA
02-18-2013, 12:44 PM
I have one that did sonlight core 100 last year. He loved almost all the books.Parental involvement includes asking the discussion questions daily, but many times I wouldn't get to them until the end of week. That was fine with ds, but I felt like I wasn't doing enough.

I had another do HOW from konos a few years back. He really enjoyed it and got a lot out of it. This is the program for the creative, and motivated learner.

Tricia O
02-18-2013, 02:19 PM
So what would you recommend for someone who is writing resistant, but loves to read, and is fairly low in teacher prep, not too hard to grade, etc.?

Laura JL
02-18-2013, 03:59 PM
So what would you recommend for someone who is writing resistant, but loves to read, and is fairly low in teacher prep, not too hard to grade, etc.?

Sonlight.

Honestly though, I believe that you can take a number of the programs and make them what you want. I have one that SL is perfect for w/ all the books -- but we do cut back on the suggestions for writing bec he's writing resistant. I made the decision to use IEW w/ him and I pick and choose ideas from IEW/SL.

For another one Notgrass works better but we don't do it as written -- she reads the history chapter and we pick and choose literature from the lists of Notgrass and SL. In doing this we then pick and choose writing too. She is one though that benefits from the written questions/quizzes that Notgrass offers and a slower reading pace than SL sets up for their literature selections.

Have you asked your dc to look at some of the options?

Rebe
02-18-2013, 05:12 PM
So what would you recommend for someone who is writing resistant, but loves to read, and is fairly low in teacher prep, not too hard to grade, etc.?

Notgrass fits those requirements. You don't have to do much writing if you don't want to, and the grade can be based on quizzes and tests (there is an answer key).

Melissa Crabtree
02-18-2013, 06:36 PM
Truthquest is literature based. You choose the books you want to read out of the lists they provide. They do have binder builder notebooking pages available.

Joy in Alabama
02-19-2013, 07:23 AM
I think TruthQuest. I don't do any writing assignments with it with Carrie because we do our writing with different subjects. She just reads and keeps a time line.

Tricia O
02-19-2013, 12:42 PM
What are the differences between Truthquest & Notgrass?

Colleen OH
02-19-2013, 04:38 PM
We have really just read books.and watch movies.

Several of mine read through all the BR SR High books. Some went through the SL 100 books. We keep history materials casually throigh the house, so inevitably they are going to learn something, right?

Heather (WI)
02-19-2013, 04:40 PM
We're using a chronological history, similar to Winter Promise, called "Heart of Dakota": www.heartofdakota.com
It fits all the requirements you were looking for, and it's Charlotte-Mason style, all planned out but still easy to adapt as needed.

CINDY LB OH
02-19-2013, 06:14 PM
So what would you recommend for someone who is writing resistant, but loves to read, and is fairly low in teacher prep, not too hard to grade, etc.?
For someone who loves to read, I would go with a literature-based program. My dd21 used the Beautiful Feet History guides. (http://bfbooks.com/Study-Guides) It gives you a novel to read, and then has assignments for keeping a notebook. We didn't do all the notebook assignments, but opted for more discussion time. They are wonderful and really put history in context. It is not teacher intensive at all, unless you want to do the books as a read aloud, which we did a lot of the time. But it's not set up that way. It's written directly to the student. Geography is included in the notebook assignments so if you just wanted to do those you could and have enough geography over the 4 years for a half credit.

For my dd18, we created our own Am. History history using library books and the internet. We used the book, We Were There Too: Young People in U.S. History (http://www.amazon.com/We-Were-There-Too-History/dp/0374382522/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1361319315&sr=1-1&keywords=we+were+there+too+young+people+in+u.s.+hi story) as our spine, and then she researched the various events and wrote a summary/timeline in her notebook. It was a fantastic study. There are tons of books related to children in history that you'll find at your library, and it was a great springboard for learning about the events themselves. We also used this series of books, People at the center of- (http://www.amazon.com/People-at-Center-Civil-War/dp/1567117643/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1361318993&sr=1-1&keywords=people+at+the+center+of+-+the+civil+war). There are quite a lot in the series, but amazon doesn't seem to list them all on one page, so you would have to search library. They give short biographies of all the key players in the events while summarizing the events themselves.

For state history, though not required for high school here, we get a membership to our state historical society and do field trips to historic places, and read as many books as we can find in the library. Again, we try and find historical fiction and biographies/autobiographies. Fun way to do state history, and you could do it over 4 years of high school and have plenty of info/time to equal a half credit.

Tricia O
02-20-2013, 04:35 AM
I think TruthQuest. I don't do any writing assignments with it with Carrie because we do our writing with different subjects. She just reads and keeps a time line.

How do you give a grade? Which volumes did you use in which grades?

Joy in Alabama
02-20-2013, 07:06 AM
Vol I - 9th, Vol 2 - 10th, Vol 3- 11th. I give a grade based on her attitude, participation, and keeping up with her time line. And I'm giving a credit for world history and and a credit for US history, broken down between all three years.

Donna in MO
02-23-2013, 06:43 PM
Ds and I created our own state history course made up of 8 2-week units, which he's doing right now. If you want me to post it, let me know.

Rebe, would you mind posting it? I'm thinking of doing something similar in lieu of the unit on North America in Around the World in 180 Days. It looks like it covers the explorers quite a bit in that unit, and we've BTDT too many times already. :unsure:

Rebe
02-23-2013, 08:01 PM
Sure, Donna. This is what we came up with for Missouri History, .5 credit.

Goal: To create your own book of Missouri history by the end of the semester.

Units (each unit is two weeks long; at the end of the second week, he turns in the "chapter" he's created for that week):
1. Origin
2. Symbols, flag, motto, etc.
3. Native Americans (who, where, etc.)
4. Civil War (who, when, what)
5. Famous people (who, when, what)
Field trip to Jeff City
6. Infamous people, outlaws
7. Natural disasters (when, what)
8. History of our city and specific suburb

Final book will have a cover, 8 chapters of photos, drawings, writing, timelines, diagrams, etc., as well as a complete bibliography.

He will also read Undaunted Courage (because I want him to read it and Lewis & Clark started from and ended here, so hey, it fits).

For each topic he requests books from the library or uses ones we already own. He also uses the encyclopedia and the Internet.

We had brainstormed other topics (natural resources, industry, etc.) and these are the ones that he wanted to do.