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Esther-Alabama
07-05-2013, 01:05 PM
This is for my 9th grade son who wants to go to college and his college of choice requires foreign language for two years. He still struggles very much with spelling and writing the English language, so my idea is to create our own class sort of like the conversational Spanish course I took for health care providers. It included cultural information and focused on real life conversations.

I would like to include field trips and maybe one mission trip to practice the skills and experience the cultural first hand.

What could I call this?

My resources will include
Rosetta Stone Spanish that we have already.
United Methodist church Spanish churches and missions locally and globally.

What other resources could I use?

Rachel Jane
07-05-2013, 01:30 PM
Immersion Spanish

Can you find him a person his age that speaks spanish as his first language and have them write and email to one another each day?

Funny aside: I have a zumba friend for whom english is her 2nd language. I asked her what one of the songs meant and she answered me in spanish. It happened again. The third time, I told her, "You know, if you answer me in spanish, I STILL don't know what it means." She accused me of not paying attention. :lol:

Esther-Alabama
07-05-2013, 01:31 PM
immersion spanish

can you find him a person his age that speaks spanish as his first language and have them write and email to one another each day?

Funny aside: I have a zumba friend for whom english is her 2nd language. I asked her what one of the songs meant and she answered me in spanish. It happened again. The third time, i told her, "you know, if you answer me in spanish, i still don't know what it means." she accused me of not paying attention. :lol:

lol!!

ETA..I like that name and the idea!

Kelly K
07-05-2013, 07:40 PM
Does your college have ASL (American Sign Language)? That's what my girls are doing as dual credit for that requirement. Might be easier for your son.

Becky in CA
07-05-2013, 08:09 PM
Does your college have ASL (American Sign Language)? That's what my girls are doing as dual credit for that requirement. Might be easier for your son.

:yes: That's what I was thinking as I read your post as well.

Hollie in SC
07-05-2013, 08:50 PM
Esther, this week that was mentioned in our testing follow-up: Eli may have a hard time with foreign language. ASL is my back up plan. Clemson wants 3 years of foreign language in high school. :perplex:

Trudy mentioned this site last week. It looked interesting and might be an additional resource:
http://www.gavirtuallearning.org/Resources/SharedSpanish1%28WLCopy%29.aspx

Dawn Gilmore
07-06-2013, 08:56 AM
ASL was going to be my suggestion as well. That's what my dd is taking... after totally bombing in both Latin and Spanish. She just DIDN'T get it. And she's my kid who is gifted in Language Arts... my dyslexic boys... I can't even imagine... one of them can barely read and write in his own language, a foreign language is NOT going to be a good thing for him.

Esther-Alabama
07-06-2013, 10:06 AM
My ds has asked to do Spanish instead of ASL. However, I know he still struggles with writing and spelling in English due to his dyslexic. SO, my idea is to do Spanish using Rosetta Stone the listening and speaking portion only and include a cultural aspect to the class....though I am searching for resources for that.

This class will focus on conversational Spanish....functional speaking, not writing or reading. I took a course for health care workers and it was only basic conversations with Spanish speakers that focused on those phrases we would need in health care. This course would focus on daily conversation, learning to speak Spanish NOT write or really read much past menus and street signs.

So, any resources you can recommend for studying the culture of the Spanish speaking people...maybe Central and South American countries. Hs cousin is in Panama for 2 years with the peace Corp and we will be planning a mission trip to her country and village sometime next year.

Shannon P
07-06-2013, 06:59 PM
ASL was my first thought as well, since it doesn't have a written component. But I understand that spoken Spanish is more useful than ASL.

Here, there are Dia de los Muertos cultural events around Halloween. A rough google indicates Birmingham has such an event, and it looks like one is planned this year.

Becky in CA
07-06-2013, 08:26 PM
What about using this resource from PBS? It's called Destinos:An Introduction to Spanish, and it looks like everything's accessible for free. I caught the tail end of this on one of the channels and actually liked it. :lol:

http://www.learner.org/resources/series75.html

Lindsey Carter
07-08-2013, 12:20 AM
One of my majors in college was Spanish Education. I never taught it beyond student teaching, but I might be able to come up with a few ideas. Here is a few things you might consider for studying culture...

-holidays: La Posada (Easter) is a big holiday do to the catholic influence in many Latin American countries., La Navidad and Dia De Los Reyes (3 kings night) are Christmas celebrations that have some unique features. Dia De Los Muertes (Day of The Dead) is sort of like Halloween and Memorial day all rolled into one. There are other interesting holidays too.
-art: Spain and other latin countries have some great works of art (Picaso, Goya, Dali, Greco, Velasquez, etc). You could look at the artwork and the time period that influenced some of the famous artists. For example "Guernecia" is a famous painting by Picaso about the Spanish Civil war. You could look at the painting and discuss the war and politics in Spain during this time period.
-You could watch the movie Evita (although you may need to pre-screen and skip any inappropriate scenes) and discuss the political impact she had.
-geography and culture: How about reading aloud to him some non-fiction books about the various Spanish speaking countries or watching travel videos.
-The Destinos videos are good
-You could watch movies dubbed in Spanish or even Sesame Street in Spanish.
-Cooking: Try making tortillas and other Spanish or Mexican food.
-Learn songs in Spanish or listen to spanish music (include some traditional mariachi)
-Latin dancing (flamenco, tango, salsa)
-learn about bull fighting
-Latin sports: Soccer, Jai alai, Pelota, boxing and other sports
-Watch a documentary about Panama canal.
-Audio books of missionary biographies

Beyond learning a lot of vocabulary, the most difficult aspects of learning Spanish are the verb system and word order. It can be challenging for neuro-typical kids and really hard for dyslexics. Have you checked to see if the Universities he is interested in will except a culture credit instead of a language class? I hope you are able to work out a good plan that works well for both of you! :)

Sheryl in NH
07-11-2013, 12:57 PM
You probably need to speak with someone in admissions.

Rosetta stone is generally not accepted for foreign language credit at many colleges/universities. Neither is ASL.

On the other hand, because your son has a documented disability, they might consider waving the requirement or allowing a program that is generally frowned upon.

Good luck!

Leslie Nelsen
07-16-2013, 10:50 PM
Agreeing that talking with an admissions person is a great idea. Requirements can vary greatly from school to school.

My oldest used Rosetta Stone and did not have any trouble with college acceptance. It may depend on the school. None of the schools to which he applied asked which program he used for Spanish. Again though, this is just our experience with a limited number of colleges (most were large state universities and one private school).

Hollie - :eek: 3 years!

Shannon P
07-18-2013, 05:28 PM
Agreeing that you talk with admissions.:thumb:

ASL is becoming more accepted as more schools recognize ASL's legitimacy as a unique language. An easy way to tell if a college accepts it is to look where it is listed in the college catalog. If it's listed under the foreign language department, they recognize it as a foreign language and likely accept high school credits. If it's listed elsewhere, such as communications, then it's probably not accepted. Talking to admissions is the best way to conclusively determine if ASL is accepted as a foreign language.

Returning to the Spanish discussion...