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View Full Version : Making sure you cover all the important stuff in high school?



DebB
12-01-2013, 08:28 PM
How do you approach this...... It is all so overwhelming! I have a 10 th grader and I feel like I'm barely keeping my head above water with him. I fear missing something important. I mean I know what credits he needs....but it's all the other stuff involved within those credits. What is the important stuff I don't wanna miss? I don't believe he will go to a 4 year college right away but we are keeping that as a possibility.

Thanks
Debbie

Miranda.in.WA
12-02-2013, 01:56 AM
What other stuff within those credits are you concerned about? I have a 10th grader too. I'm feeling comfortable with his courses/credits, but I worry some about him being prepared to live on his own...balancing a checkbook, living within a budget, having a schedule for household chores so his home doesn't look like his bedroom, making good choices regarding social activities, etc. This boy won't be moving out for several years, but I worry.

Having two already gone off to college, I would say that knowing how to memorize and study is #1 for college bound.
Knowing how to write different kinds of essays/papers.
Knowing how to take notes during a lecture.
Knowing how to schedule assignments and study time (because college professors don't remind you of term paper due dates, they hand you a syllabus the first day...)
Being able to work hard and problem solve on a job.
Being confident and asking for help when needed.

Those are just a few things I can think of, but I'm not exactly sure where those might fit into the individual credits.

Joy in Alabama
12-02-2013, 09:38 AM
What other stuff within those credits are you concerned about? I have a 10th grader too. I'm feeling comfortable with his courses/credits, but I worry some about him being prepared to live on his own...balancing a checkbook, living within a budget, having a schedule for household chores so his home doesn't look like his bedroom, making good choices regarding social activities, etc. This boy won't be moving out for several years, but I worry.

Having two already gone off to college, I would say that knowing how to memorize and study is #1 for college bound.
Knowing how to write different kinds of essays/papers.
Knowing how to take notes during a lecture.
Knowing how to schedule assignments and study time (because college professors don't remind you of term paper due dates, they hand you a syllabus the first day...)
Being able to work hard and problem solve on a job.
Being confident and asking for help when needed.

Those are just a few things I can think of, but I'm not exactly sure where those might fit into the individual credits.

Ditto here. We've got a bunch of grown kids and several in college at the moment (working slowly). Ditto on knowing how to live on their own. Ditto knowing how to find info.

A couple of my kids are doing college online (College Plus is their mentoring/coaching program). Anna is taking her first ever course in a classroom this semester and doing really well with it. She told me they had to go to the library for a tour and she went along because she got 25 pts for it. But there was a boy next to her who said he had never been in a library. :eek: And the librarian was giving very basic info. So, learning how to learn is really, really, really important IMO. Also, I think social skills are important before they are thrown into living away from home. And how to hold a job and do well on the job. Those things are just off the top of my head from knowing what my kids have faced in both jobs where they manage kids (Chick Fil A) and hearing my kids' problems/challenges since they've moved out.

Have y'all started studying/taking the ACT or SAT? You should see if you need to go back and study something to a greater depth after your child has taken it for the first time.

Rebe
12-02-2013, 11:59 AM
Great tips, Miranda. :thumb:

I used to worry about this, too (not "covering" everything), but you know, you just can't "cover" all of it. Much of it is just going to come through life lessons and experiences. What I'm finding is that teaching someone how to write a check, for instance, is a good idea. But when it really clicks is when they get a job, start a checking account, have their own bank books, and write that first "real" check or learn how to do online banking, or use a debit card. All of this my son has done in the last month. Nothing I could have really done to prepare him for it -- it's just life, and how it changes and develops as they get older.

His experiences with a real job have been incredible (also a Chick-Fil-A employee!). Wow. Stuff I couldn't teach him in a million years, he's learning from other adult mentors and even from his teen co-workers. GREAT experience before leaving home. And all of that leads to learning financial management, as well.

One thing I've found is that teens need you SO much. One big thing to remember is to check in with them frequently, because their lives are changing so quickly and they have so much to think about. I'm checking up on my ds (in a non-overbearing way, I hope) often. I love how it's falling into place -- the time management, the finances, the decision making, getting himself to and from places on time, etc.. Stuff you can't learn from books, yet are crucial life skills. I'm not saying he's good at it yet, or will be perfect by the time he leaves home (I'm sure he won't be), but at least there is that learning going on under our roof and our oversight before he's on his own.

If you're talking about academics, I try to just trust the curriculum. If it's high school level and he's completing it, that's good by me. I second Joy's suggestion to take the ACT or SAT by junior year. That way he's done that (probably 2 or more times) if he does go to college.

Kelly K
12-02-2013, 03:19 PM
WWWWWWWWWWHHHHHHHHHHHHATTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT? You mean balancing chemistry equations isn't it???? I love you all. Thank you for some perspective from those who have gone before me.

Alice R
12-02-2013, 05:54 PM
I totally agree.

My son is lacking in some "life skills" areas...mostly because he is a teen and not an adult, which is what we are here for.

Academically, I regret not working MUCH harder on his writing skills.

We are still working on being responsible for your own assignments and not depending on mom to figure out what to do.
We are working on how to take notes and being able to write quickly. Classroom teachers/professors don't wait for you like mom does.
You have to know how to memorize usless stuff. Sounds silly but it is reality. WHY would I make my son memorize usesless things? Unfortunately, there is a alot of useless stuff you have to know in life in order to pass a test etc. It's reality.

Joy in Alabama
12-03-2013, 02:49 PM
I totally agree.

My son is lacking in some "life skills" areas...mostly because he is a teen and not an adult, which is what we are here for.

Academically, I regret not working MUCH harder on his writing skills.

We are still working on being responsible for your own assignments and not depending on mom to figure out what to do.
We are working on how to take notes and being able to write quickly. Classroom teachers/professors don't wait for you like mom does.
You have to know how to memorize usless stuff. Sounds silly but it is reality. WHY would I make my son memorize usesless things? Unfortunately, there is a alot of useless stuff you have to know in life in order to pass a test etc. It's reality.

This is true. My dds take CLEPs and they have to memorize a lot of useless dates, etc. to pass the tests.

Julie in AZ
12-04-2013, 10:27 AM
We are still working on being responsible for your own assignments and not depending on mom to figure out what to do.
We are working on how to take notes and being able to write quickly. Classroom teachers/professors don't wait for you like mom does.
You have to know how to memorize usless stuff. Sounds silly but it is reality. WHY would I make my son memorize usesless things? Unfortunately, there is a alot of useless stuff you have to know in life in order to pass a test etc. It's reality.

We are working on all the same things here. We talk a lot about how studying is MEMORIZING, not just reading it once. ;)