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View Full Version : Gifted student and starting high school subjects early...???



Esther-Alabama
05-16-2014, 02:58 PM
My 11 yr old 6th grader is very advanced. He is moving into algebra 1, he is ready for high school level history and science.

I have held him off of starting algebra 1 till his older brother finished it, but honestly there is nothing else for him to do in math except algebra 1.

I've had him working with his younger brother in Beyond FIAR and he likes this, but he is always asking more in depth information on every topic, which I provide resources for and such, but I can tell he is just moving beyond it and has been bored with the last few things we've done.

Worked out this week that all the kids were learning about the Cold War, the Korean War, Truman, and Ike. We watched a 4 hr documentary on Truman, read speeches and other commentaries on the era, discussed many different aspects of it. He worked on and finished a 5 paragraph essay on Korea and then last night he came to me and asked if he could watch another documentary on how Korea became split.

His brother is working thru Notgrass history and I had Paul read all the parts about this era, too. Not only did he understand it, but he could easily do the work. He is socially and emotionally 11, but he is just brilliant in his studies.

So, here's my question....how to I document that he is skipping two grades? If we decide to do this officially....How does that work? And should I do it officially. He must have documented credit hours to graduate and if he is doing that level work...shouldn't i give him credit for it? He will be just shy of 16 when he graduates high school IF we put him on a four year schedule for high school. What then? Community college? Online college? Should I do a five year plan?

His goal currently is something in the computer industry...he loves programming. I'm looking for coding classes everywhere and have done almost everything I can find online for him.

I'm just not sure really and frankly it just struck me when I began looking for curriculum for them this week.

Insights? Advice?

Joy in Alabama
05-16-2014, 03:39 PM
Esther, which school are you with? What does your administrator have to say? Is she (he?) willing to go ahead and give him high school credit?

Several years ago we knew a boy who graduated when he was about 14 or 15. It was kind of hard for him to go to college because the people there gave him a hard time, but he was sort of a smart aleck and probably invited some of the criticism (sorry, but that was my take on it). :lol: Have you looked at doing college classes concurrently with high school? Anna's boyfriend was out of college by the time he was finished with high school by using College Plus. Have you thought about that?

If your administrator doesn't have some sort of problem with it (and, being one myself, I can't see why she should), I would just go ahead and give him credit. It always seems dumb to me to have to re-do courses at a certain "age" or "grade level", just so we can be like everyone else. I mean, the beauty of hsing is that we can do what we like. If he graduates early, he'll have to take his diploma with him to get his driver's license in Alabama - that would be funny, wouldn't it? :lol:

Heather W
05-16-2014, 03:50 PM
If it's high school work, it gets high school credit. How ever it is that you do reporting/recording on that, you just note the high school credit given.

As to whether you should graduate him early, that is different. I think it depends on the kid.

Esther-Alabama
05-16-2014, 04:43 PM
My admin is fine with him getting credit for the classes. She's known him a long time and agrees with me.

As far as graduating early and off to college...I doubt that. He would probably stay home and do online classes or maybe take a couple classes at the community college nearby.

I've looked at college plus...I'm not sure about it though. I need to look at it closer.

WendyW
05-16-2014, 07:29 PM
Does your state pay for college classes for high school students? If so, keep that in mind. If he is still officially in high school, you could maybe get his first year of two of college free. If he's already graduated on paper, that might not work.

Esther-Alabama
05-16-2014, 08:05 PM
Does your state pay for college classes for high school students? If so, keep that in mind. If he is still officially in high school, you could maybe get his first year of two of college free. If he's already graduated on paper, that might not work.

Nope...our state doesn't do that, but I wish they did. That would be an easier decision!

Miranda.in.WA
05-16-2014, 09:08 PM
Is it you as mom granting credits or a public school? My answer would mimic Heather's.

I would also say to nurture the emotional side of this bright boy (which I know you are). Some subject matter and reading material is done in high school not necessarily for its difficulty, but for the social/emotional impact on the student. :)

Kelly K
05-16-2014, 11:26 PM
BTDT. My 14yo dd is in 10th gr. That means she'll graduate when she is 16. She is in her 3rd semester at the cc and it's working well. I never realized (duh) if you move them up, they'll be done younger. Right now, her plans are to stay at home and go to college, which I am OK with. But, I'd be much less comfortable if the eventual plan was to send them off to college where they'd stay in a dorm. I think it would be like sending a lamb to the slaughter, boy or girl.

I think if I had to do it again, I would PACK their school schedule full of extra things to learn. Don't load the transcript up with 9000 credits, only put the reasonable stuff. Maybe make a footnote like additional topics covered or something. The problem is, once they are in 10th grade, it's awfully hard to say "well, now I'm going to hold you back from graduation". Let him go to the cc and get his feet wet and take one class a semester. Then, after awhile, they can take two.

The other area it's been a little funky is driving. She is in 10th grade. Her sister is learning to drive. She is not old enough. And won't be for a long time yet. Boy does that burn her up!!!

So at the CC, we've been careful to try and avoid the mature content stuff and so far have been successful. And I really do think she is mature enough. It's just that I don't know how other people will deal with her. If she did go off to college, I wouldn't want her dating a 19yo or a 22 yo just yet. KWIM??

If you are going to skip, you can do a transcript organized by subject instead of year. Instead of listing the years, you would just put Alg 1 (grade) credits, Alg 2 (letter grade not grade taken).

I ended up bumping her up a long time ago. It seemed silly to me to test the grade she was supposed to be in instead of the one she was in. I wanted to know where she was with what she was supposed to have learned. Std tsts are such a joke. She was getting amazing scores since she was two grades ahead and it seemed foolish to me. Now, it makes a little more sense.

WendyW
05-17-2014, 12:07 AM
I'd be more inclined to grant credit for subjects like math that are purely academic in nature, and less likely to do so for subjects such as history or literature where there is much discussion that requires a mature understanding of the subject matter. Their brains change so much throughout adolescence and the kind of understanding they gain in the later years of high school is much different than what they might glean in younger years.

Paige P
05-19-2014, 09:20 AM
Esther, we have a local lady who has graduated two dc who came to talk to our hs group about high school and giving credits, etc. When her dd started 9th, her ds was in 7th, and she continued to keep them together for certain subjects. She said the only way she noted that was at the top of the transcript, she put the dates, i.e., "2005-2011." (just an example) -- so, it LOOKS like he took 6 years to completely high school, and perhaps he did, but the reality is is that he started taking classes for high school credit in 7th grade. She said he applied to many colleges and no one ever questioned those dates. The rest of the transcript just looked "normal" -- she listed Math: and then the 4 classes he taught (but didn't write the years he took them), Science, Social Studies, etc.

Does that help you figure out how it could "look" on paper without drawing as many questions? Of course, if he's completely finished at 15, then questions will arise, but it's a way to get started :)


One more thing -- did you know that UA has an "Early College" program? Typically, it's for 10th graders and up and classes can be taken online or at the University for dual enrollment credits. It might be a great opportunity for him when he gets a bit older to be able to get some college under his belt and still be at home :)

Esther-Alabama
05-19-2014, 10:10 AM
Esther, we have a local lady who has graduated two dc who came to talk to our hs group about high school and giving credits, etc. When her dd started 9th, her ds was in 7th, and she continued to keep them together for certain subjects. She said the only way she noted that was at the top of the transcript, she put the dates, i.e., "2005-2011." (just an example) -- so, it LOOKS like he took 6 years to completely high school, and perhaps he did, but the reality is is that he started taking classes for high school credit in 7th grade. She said he applied to many colleges and no one ever questioned those dates. The rest of the transcript just looked "normal" -- she listed Math: and then the 4 classes he taught (but didn't write the years he took them), Science, Social Studies, etc.

Does that help you figure out how it could "look" on paper without drawing as many questions? Of course, if he's completely finished at 15, then questions will arise, but it's a way to get started :)


One more thing -- did you know that UA has an "Early College" program? Typically, it's for 10th graders and up and classes can be taken online or at the University for dual enrollment credits. It might be a great opportunity for him when he gets a bit older to be able to get some college under his belt and still be at home :)


Wonderful information, Paige! Thank you!

I did know about UA early college program. My goddaughter did that and will start college with 12 credits. I'm considering it for all my children. Troy university offers dual enrollment and accelerated college for students in 10th grade! I'm hoping my oldest can also do this program and get his English and history credits at home.

Frankly, these types programs make this decision very easy for me. My boy can stay at home, mature, but he can continue his education. The possibilities are endless for high school really. I have enjoyed planning for it.

Paige P
06-05-2014, 11:24 AM
Esther, just saw this article and thought of you :) https://shine.yahoo.com/experts/how-we-got-our-kids-into-college-by-age-12-175102493.html

They've apparently written a book -- might offer you some info. Plus, they're from Montgomery.....