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View Full Version : Why does my daughter add extra sounds when sounding out new words?



Alice R
08-03-2009, 10:38 PM
I'm getting a little worried because my husband did/does this and he has reading problems and processing problems. Anytime he has a new word to sound out (like last names of children) it is an experience to hear what new sounds he can put in there. ;) It's hard to diagnose an adult but he clearly had reading problems as a child that were not addressed at all. We looked at old report cards and he failed Reading every single quarter. :eek: He had himself tested in college and there could've been some dyslexia but again, it's hard to find this in an adult who has figured out compensatory strategies.

Alise is 7 and we are working on reading. (we fell way behind when she was sick for 6 months from winter to spring). She adds in sounds that aren't there. :unsure: Just like her father. :unsure:

"Sad" becomes "Sand".

She does it about 40% of the time. I nicely point out that there is no "n" in the word sand and then she gets all flustered and adds in another sound. :unsure:

Is this a developmental thing or is this a red flag?

My older two boys learned to read rather easily. One fast and one slow but they both read without any of these concerns.

Anyone know what is going on with that?

Melinda
08-03-2009, 10:59 PM
Interesting...one of my twins does this. :/ Slowly--I mean s l o w l y--we're trying to break it. When she's tired, it's worse. Reading outloud has helped much because I do like you do and point out the added sounds. The more she reads, the more she easily recognizes words, the less she adds extra sounds. It's frustrating!

Robin(CA)
08-04-2009, 12:54 AM
My ds will do this sometimes -- he'll be 8 next month. (We're around lesson 40 in RME for reference, words like sand, bang, ship, etc.)

I think he's guessing, trying to read it faster. I notice he won't really look at the entire word, he kind of glances at the beginning and then his attention will move to elsewhere on the page. :lol: I think it's something that he will outgrow, he's just impatient to learn to read and trying to speed up the process.

I'm interested in hearing other perspective though. My first ds didn't do this.

Rebe
08-04-2009, 01:04 AM
My 7yo does this. I had never encountered this before, either! He also adds entire small words to the sentence that aren't there. And he also switches out small words for other small words, like reading "it" instead of "the" or something like that.

All of these things are small. Adding one letter, adding a small word, or switching out a small word. I don't know what it is exactly. I've just figured that he's not detail-oriented. And he certainly isn't, in the rest of his life. And he's guessing, like Robin said. I'm not worried about it. He's not too fond of reading, so I don't want to make it harder on him at this point. But I do have to listen to him read (I had quit doing this very early on with my other two). At least if I'm listening I can slow him down and make him focus on the little things. :perplex:

AmyinWI
08-04-2009, 01:25 AM
I don't know- my 5yo that has speech issues does this too..
and recently I noticed she is starting to add a long e to the ends of words- "can I have my cup- e?" I don't know if she's trying to be cute or what. I bring it to her attention and she stops.

Alice R
08-04-2009, 08:27 AM
You know, normally, I'd think it was a kid thing.

But looking at my husband's reading and how he does this too, I wonder if it's a red flag.

I tried googling it up last night and it can be a red flag if there are other things...it was probably not the best thing to google up at midnight because now I'm not sure what I read. :yawn:

More anxiety....:eek: :lol:

I'm glad (sort of) to see that Alise is not the only one doing this. Maybe it is a kid thing? I hope so.

BethInOK
08-04-2009, 09:15 AM
My DD does this (almost 5). Its more noticeable when she's tired or frustrated. I haven't really worried about it. It seems like when she's tired or frustrated it gets worse. She is also one who wants instant mastery, so I think its tied to that.

Kelly K
08-04-2009, 09:29 AM
I don't know if it's a problem, but Phonics Pathways may help. It focuses a LOT on two letter blends. For example, if you were going to work on the short a sound it would do

b-a ba
c-a ca
d-a da
f-a fa

and down the list. You might think it a little dull, but it really helps work through that. It was what I needed for my #3 kiddo.

Alice R
08-04-2009, 11:15 AM
I LOVE Phonics Pathways. This is what we are using.

I guess we just have to keep working...:unsure:

Jeni
08-04-2009, 01:13 PM
My 11yo still does this on occasion with unfamiliar words. He's much much better than he was when he was 7 or 8 so it can improve but it was a long road. ;)

We just work on segmenting, a LOT! :lol:

We took the sounds apart and put them back together. Put them together and take them apart. When he would add sounds to a word, we would sound out the word and blend it back together. Yes he would get frustrated and flustered and I would try to avoid that but I also wouldn't let him keep mispronouncing the word.

Another thing I would do is have him segment the word like "sand". Then I would have him point to each sound in the word. Obviously he's not going to find that /n/ in "sad". He would see his own mistake and correct himself. Much more dignified than having mom point out your mistake. :lol: ;)

Yup, at 7yo I would just keep working. ;)

Shauna in TX
08-04-2009, 02:38 PM
DD does this on occasion. I have found if I cover up the letters and reveal them one at a time when it happens (like "s" then "sa" then "sad") it prevents the adding of extra other letters after correction.

Sasha
08-04-2009, 04:52 PM
DD does this on occasion. I have found if I cover up the letters and reveal them one at a time when it happens (like "s" then "sa" then "sad") it prevents the adding of extra other letters after correction.

My son has a tendency to do this but I go back to what Shauna says. We started learning with the Ordinary parent's Guide to Teaching Reading, she teaches to do this in the beginning so that your child's eyes and brain are trained to read left to right, one word at a time.

I can't remember which book it was, wish I did now! but it was on all kinds of research on reading and discussed the whole language method which wrongly taught kids to look for for things like "apple", remember it starts with an "a" had has two p's in it. Basically it was teaching the kids to scan the word because at the time they believed once we knew how to read our eyes don't go over every letter, just the first couple. Once they had the computer technology to test what letters a persons' eyes looked at and they were shocked to find that our eyes go over each letter, even short words like "the."

Sorry for being long winded! I just found this fascinating so I really emphasized this with my boys and when I notice them adding sounds or trying to guess the word by just looking at the first two letters I go back to covering up each letter, or diphthong.
Does your dh remember how he was taught to read? Most of us don't, I only know 'cause my grandma taught me and she tells me how she did it :lol:

JuliaT
08-04-2009, 10:33 PM
Alice, here is a fairly comprhensive list of symptoms of dyslexia (http://www.brightsolutions.us ) I think there is an icon at the top of the page that will take you to the symptoms.

My two oldest add in sounds. After reading the symptom list, I became absolutely sure that my kids were dyslexic. What I thought were little ideosyncrasies were actually characteristics of dyslexia.

Maybe the list will help firm it in your mind whether this is a red flag or not.

Robin H in VA
08-05-2009, 09:17 AM
Wow Alice, I could have wrote your post!

My ds and dh do this also. My mil says that dh had problems when he was younger, but was never tested, his teachers said that he was just doing things to get out of doing other things? :unsure: He would mix up letters and sounds and numbers as well. He still has lots of problems reading and new things with new words are a problem. Even down to reading a book to ds, dh will read words that aren't there (make new words of the ones that are there).

Ds does the exact same things. We are starting a program today with Literacy Volunteers, not sure right now what they will do, but I am hoping it helps ds and maybe I can get dh involved also.

I will be watching this post to see what other suggest/have done in the same situation.

carriejoy
08-07-2009, 02:32 AM
DD does this on occasion. I have found if I cover up the letters and reveal them one at a time when it happens (like "s" then "sa" then "sad") it prevents the adding of extra other letters after correction.

I'm tutoring Selena right now for reading due to dyslexia and this is one of the strategies we use. We go letter at a time for the first 3 or 4 words to help train and remind her brain to actually LOOK at the letters in the correct order/direction rather than the random coping strategy she'd developed (that wasn't so much coping!)

Alice, if you suspect dyslexia (which was my first thought before reading the other posts) and you'd like some info on the strategies I'm using with Selena (that have REALLY helped) feel free to email me and we can talk.

Rosanna
08-08-2009, 05:06 PM
Aaron does this as well, but thankfully after reading the list I don't think he's has dyslexia, or if he does it's not severe- my husband does, so I have been concerned a bit- I think Aaron just moves to quickly- guessing- if I break the words up then he most of the time is able to figure things out.

Glad to know he's not alone in this! And it is getting better (he'll be 7 in November).

Back to my hubby- we were listening to a radio commercial for people who needed help with dyslexia, and they gave out a 1800 number to call if you needed help- just numbers no word association, and they only repeated the number one time- my DH just looked at me and said, "That is the stupidest commercial I've ever heard! What person with dyslexia is going to be able to write that phone number down correctly to call it!" (when I give him phone numbers over the phone I have to be sure to only say two numbers at a time and then he reads it back to me twice slowly to be sure he has it!)

KathleenM
08-09-2009, 09:31 AM
Alice, here is a fairly comprhensive list of symptoms of dyslexia (http://www.brightsolutions.us ) I think there is an icon at the top of the page that will take you to the symptoms.

My two oldest add in sounds. After reading the symptom list, I became absolutely sure that my kids were dyslexic. What I thought were little ideosyncrasies were actually characteristics of dyslexia.

Maybe the list will help firm it in your mind whether this is a red flag or not.

This was my first thought. Dyslexia is kind of a catch-all term for different processing problems a child may have. My son does what you and others in this thread describe, and an optometrist said that he has problems with eye teaming and convergence. These problems create visual processing issues, and explain why he's having so much trouble reading! We're looking at our options and exploring this problem further...