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Negin
09-10-2009, 04:39 AM
I once read (maybe it was Beechick, maybe it was in CM Companion, or somewhere else) to avoid correcting any mistakes in their journals. Although I never use my red pen and mark their journals, when I simply point out their mistakes (spelling, grammar, punctuation), it doesn't sink in. They listen for a few seconds and are ready to move on to something else.
Should I point out their mistakes and have them re-write the misspelled words or sentences on another piece of paper? I know they'll hate that ... but it's not really the point. I hated many things in school. ;)
How do you correct journal mistakes, if at all?

I would like to add that they LOVE to journal and beg for it all the time. Probably because they really have a free-for-all. They're allowed to be as imaginative and creative (and crazy :crazy:) as they want to be. I have tried and tried to lead them to write about things that happened yesterday and so on, but they prefer to be funny and imaginative. I'm fine with that. Should I be more strict? :unsure:

Tricia O
09-10-2009, 06:24 AM
My kids don't journal, but I don't correct the writings they do on their own. However, I do use them as springboards for ideas on what to teach next, or as words to add to their spelling list (Elizabeth only, as Katie doesn't do spelling yet). I don't start official spelling until they are reading very well anyway.

Jeni
09-10-2009, 06:47 AM
My 11yo just started a new grammar and writing program that includes daily journal entries. In the instructions, it states that journal entries are not to be graded or even read by the teacher unless the student shares it. I cringe and bite my tongue at these first entries he has made but I just make mental notes to myself where to put the emphasis when we come to those parts of the writing lessons (which are completely separate from the journal entries) I'm hopeful that after we complete a few of the writing lessons, I'll see an improvement in his journal entries.

Sasha
09-10-2009, 09:37 AM
I remember my mom correcting my grammar in my personal writings (I wrote stories instead of journals) when I was a kid, I never let her see my stuff again, and to this point I still have a hang up about people reading my stuff :lol:. Some day when I die my family will probably be shocked at the stories I have hidden away.

But of course your dc might not be as sensitive as me! :D

Heather W
09-10-2009, 09:39 AM
Let the journals go!

DD in IL
09-10-2009, 09:41 AM
I consider a journal to be theirs where they are free to be creative. I personally don't correct dgs' journal. As he learns more he will make less mistakes. I want him to enjoy writing.

Julie Y
09-10-2009, 09:42 AM
What you can do is make a note to yourself (on a post-it) about the things you see that need addressing -- and then do that in another venue.

Someday, you will want to re-read those journals and the misspellings, etc. will be precious to you.

Jen M
09-10-2009, 10:27 AM
I do not correct journals.

Tracey
09-10-2009, 10:48 AM
I only look at the journals when asked. Occasionally they will like to read them out loud. :)

Robin(CA)
09-10-2009, 11:18 AM
I bet it was the Love to Learn LA program. In this case, the assignment is to journal daily and then correct it together (learning grammar, spelling, and other language arts skills through experience). This is different than an actual personal journal.

I wouldn't correct personal journals, but if you were doing Language Arts the Love to Learn way, where it was a daily assignment that your child knew would be edited, then I would think that would be OK.

Laura F
09-10-2009, 11:19 AM
When I taught ps and used journals, I did not grade grammar or spelling. This usually discourages the point of keeping a journal. Whenever I made comments, I only responded to the subject or the emotions. I considered journaling a daily grade--like homework--where the point was to try!

Lori D
09-10-2009, 01:02 PM
From a different perspective-- I have the journals that my oldest three children wrote in during our first three years or four years of homechooling. They are precious- and their mistakes are incredibly precious. I am sure I made note of recurring errors and pointed them out at other times, but their journals were for them-- no correcting allowed. ;)

From the perspective of wanting to encourage quality writing, two of my adult dds took a writing class in college from the same teacher. This teacher had the students journal a lot. Some journaling was directed (read this, think about for 5 minutes and then write non-stop for 10 minutes) and some of was "free" journaling. The writing in their journals was never corrected!! There were encouraging comments left in the side bar (the teacher looked for positive things to say), but not corrections. This same teacher picked apart official papers like no other!! I think it was that combo that really pushed my dds to better writing. They had the freedom to be creative without fear of making work, yet had the structure of a teacher that held them to high standard when turning in a research paper or essay.

Negin
09-11-2009, 05:14 AM
Thank you all for these really helpful tips. :)


My 11yo just started a new grammar and writing program that includes daily journal entries.
Jeni, would you mind sharing what program you're using? Do you like it so far? Do they have journal prompts or is the child free to write about anything?


I remember my mom correcting my grammar in my personal writings (I wrote stories instead of journals) when I was a kid, I never let her see my stuff again, and to this point I still have a hang up about people reading my stuff :lol:. Some day when I die my family will probably be shocked at the stories I have hidden away.
But of course your dc might not be as sensitive as me! :D
Very, very important reminder, Sasha. Thank you for that! :)


Let the journals go!
Heather, maybe it's too early in the morning ... but do you mean let them go as in let them be free to write what they want and not correct them OR let them go as in journaling is not effective? Sorry, my brain cells aren't fully here at the moment. :unsure: I always love your LA feedback!


What you can do is make a note to yourself (on a post-it) about the things you see that need addressing -- and then do that in another venue.
Someday, you will want to re-read those journals and the misspellings, etc. will be precious to you.
Julie, great tip about the post-its. I'm the Queen of Post-Its, so that's very do-able. :D

Ladies, these tips are really helpful. Thank you all!

Jeni
09-11-2009, 09:34 AM
Sure Negin, he's using Saxon Grammar and Writing, formerly Hake Grammar and Writing. I really like it as it includes everything I always want to do (copywork, dictation, journaling, writing lessons, grammar, diagramming, vocabulary, word roots) but never seem to be able to get it all together myself. Somehow, it's easier for me to implement when all the planning has been done for me. ;) There are dication sentences and journaling topics but they book tells you that you are free to choose your own if you want. Copywork is on Monday and you use the same passage for dication on Friday. Journaling is Tuesday - Thursday and there are enough journal topics in the back for 3 days a week for 36 weeks.
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Negin
09-12-2009, 03:26 AM
Sure Negin, he's using Saxon Grammar and Writing ... I really like it as it includes everything I always want to do (copywork, dictation, journaling, writing lessons, grammar, diagramming, vocabulary, word roots) but never seem to be able to get it all together myself. Somehow, it's easier for me to implement when all the planning has been done for me. ;)

Jeni, this sounds really good. I also love it when I don't have to reinvent the wheel. ;) Going to spend some time looking into this.

April Marie
09-18-2009, 02:31 AM
i don't correct journals either
they are "free writes" in every way