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View Full Version : chemistry supplies - trying not to panic



Denise, Guam
09-30-2009, 02:12 AM
Recently two different people donated a bunch of science supplies to me -- stuff such as test tubes, beakers, pipettes and a bunch of stuff I can't even remember the names of ---and even some chemicals!

Okay, here is the thing, I was horrible in science. I had very little in high school and when I got to college I had to take general chemistry, biochemistry, organic chemistry and it was a disaster for me. I survived by the skin of my teeth. I am panicked even looking at this stuff and thinking I will have to use it to teach some day. Won't I blow the house up? :lol: I told one of the ladies, "but my kids are only 5th and 3rd grade" and she said I will be using it very soon! Are you kidding?? :eek:

Secondly, we don't have any storage space left whatsoever; I already have boxes of projects and school supplies overtaking my office and bedroom. How much of this stuff will I actually use and what things should I save and store? So far my only science has been FIAR and Beyond (and nature studies) - no other science curriculums. I know it is hard for anyone to answer since I don't even remember what some of this stuff is called. :unsure:

How much stuff have you used in your studies?

Angela Rose
09-30-2009, 07:44 AM
Hey Denise,
My children are itty-bitties, but I am a former PS Chemistry teacher. I know all this stuff is intimidating, but honestly if you can bake, you are a chemist !! I would definitly keep all the test tubes and glassware. When you do venture into chemistry, you don't want to use your kitchenware for chemical reactions. You do, however, need to be careful with what type of chemicals you store in your home and how you store them. Some chemicals cannot and should not be stored near each other, think ammonia and bleach. If you want to pm me with a list of the chemicals, I would be happy to help you out with storage advice.
Also, alot of chemistry can be done with household chemicals, things you can buy at the grocery and hardware store. You can do this!!! Don't be scared, think of it as an adventure you get to journey with your kids. It will be fun and they will appreciate your efforts to expose them to things outside of your comfort zone.

Angela

Rachel Jane
09-30-2009, 08:26 AM
Would it help if I posted a list of what we received in the chemistry lit we just purchased for this school year?

Di in NJ
09-30-2009, 07:48 PM
I'm going to second what Angela said. I graduated college with a food science degree. Science just made more sense to me when related to food. We see food all the time. When you start to look into doing more in-depth science with them, gear things toward food-related experiments. It will make a lot more sense to you, and I'll bet you're learn a lot about why things happen (or go terribly wrong, LOL) in the kitchen.

Denise, Guam
10-04-2009, 07:34 AM
When you start to look into doing more in-depth science with them, gear things toward food-related experiments.

sounds like good advice - thanks!

Denise, Guam
10-04-2009, 07:36 AM
Would it help if I posted a list of what we received in the chemistry lit we just purchased for this school year?

RJ - What ages are your kids and are you using the kit with a certain curriculum? How do you plan to use it? Thanks!

Denise, Guam
10-04-2009, 07:37 AM
Thanks for the encouragement, Angela Rose , and I may try to pm you with a couple questions.

Rachel Jane
10-04-2009, 07:55 AM
http://www.scienceforhighschool.com/chemsamples.shtml
This is the curric I am using.
J is 15 and L is 13.
I plan on using it as suggested. The students spend M through Th researching the answers to the questions presented in their books and then do a lab on Friday.
This curric is designed for someone older than your DC. I just thought you might like to see the material list for the labs so you would know what to keep.

Denise, Guam
10-04-2009, 05:20 PM
That looks interesting, Which chemicals came with that kit, then? Thanks for your help!

Rachel Jane
10-04-2009, 08:03 PM
That looks interesting, Which chemicals came with that kit, then? Thanks for your help!

:roflol:
You don't know what you are asking!
:roflol:

The company from which I purchased this kit separated all of the chemicals needed into little vials labeled with that experiment's number.
For example:
Lab #2's baggie has little vials with cupric sulfate, copper, sulfur, carbon, sugar, and a vial that looks empty that says hydrogen and oxygen gas.
The lab instructions are very clear and you are set up to succeed with the materials and information given.

You are also given a grocery store items list with the lab number for which it is needed next to the item. Great info for planning ahead. These are things like ammonia, styrofoam cups, olive oil, purple cabbage, lye, seltzer tablets that fizz...

If you are interested in the kit, you could either call the company or email them. The woman with whom I spoke was very helpful and personable. She probably has a master list of necessary chemicals.

Is it difficult to call America?

Denise, Guam
10-05-2009, 05:39 PM
Oh, sorry! :lol: I take it there is quite a load of stuff and no supplies list. I guess they don't want my type who always piece things together myself, rather than getting a complete kit!

Thanks for your help!

Rachel Jane
10-05-2009, 06:24 PM
Oh, sorry! :lol: I take it there is quite a load of stuff and no supplies list. I guess they don't want my type who always piece things together myself, rather than getting a complete kit!

Thanks for your help!

What I can do, if you desire, is make a list on my word program as I do the labs. Then I could give it to you at the end of the year. This would be useful to me in case I visit the experiments again and would only take a few moments.

Denise, Guam
10-05-2009, 09:35 PM
Rachel Jane,
Don't worry about spelling it all out. I think I have been given enough info to work with! Appreciate your response! :)