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Sue G in PA
10-05-2009, 11:00 PM
Does anyone teach History separate from the tidbits that are taught in each FIAR book? I'm concerned that my 3rd grader hasn't really had ANY history thus far. Should I be adding a full history program? I think I'd like to do American with him but honestly can not take on another full "program". What would you do in this situation? Stick with what is covered in FIAR? Do some read alouds from various key periods in American History? I'm just so concerned this child is not learning enough.

JenLP
10-05-2009, 11:07 PM
We are doing history separately for several reasons, none of which have anything to do with the FIAR program. :) I feel that I am deficient in history, and DD really loves it, so we are doing a separate program so that we can cover it chronologically.

I'm also relatively new to FIAR, but American history does seem to be one area that gets covered particularly well in FIAR. I'm sure one of the more experienced FIAR moms will weigh in on how they have covered history. :)

Robin(CA)
10-05-2009, 11:30 PM
We've never done any history outside of the topics covered in FIAR, but I feel like ds has had a great exposure to history. We've discussed the Civil War and the history of slavery while rowing Who Owns the Sun and Follow the Drinking Gourd and most recently we covered a bunch of topics surrounding the American Revolution while rowing Paul Revere's ride.

While rowing Warm as Wool we talked about pioneers and wagon trains and westward expansion and All the Secrets of the World gave us a chance to talk about WWII.

We discuss any potential history topics on Monday (with our Social Studies lessons), then at various times over the next few weeks I will read picture books or non-fiction books that expand on the history topic. With younger students I didn't do go alongs, but I find it valuable for my 10yo and 8yo to add some indepth study of certain topics (and the ability to request books and have the library pull them from the shelves for me makes it very easy!)

The key is that I will continue to discuss the history topics as they come up in everyday life, even after our week of rowing a particular book is over. For example, I checked out the Liberty Kids dvds last week even though we rowed Paul Revere last month. It refreshes their memory of our study from that week and gives them new information at a rate that they are able to digest.

Ernestine
10-05-2009, 11:37 PM
We use the Veritas Press history cards.

For the past month we have been in World War 1, Roaring 20's, The Depression, and World War 2.
We use the cards chronologically and tie in books and movies.
You can set up all the 5 books in order of history and row them.
Someone will have a list for this.

If the kids are young you are better off to go by the manuals because you will miss the true abundance of the book if it is not done in season.

My dc are older so we may do a bio of a 5 book character or event. When it pertain to a date or theme.
I just posted about Netflix A Daring Flight--Nova (the grandson of Bleriot and his story of his grandfather)

Take a breath and relax. It is definatly easier than you think.
5 is not all that separated when you pray for creatvity on how venture out with it.
That is one of the beauties of 5.

Also, a good reference like Historica helps.
Good Luck.

Sincerely,
Ernestine

Edit to say I think my dc really enjoy history because of all the 5 stories. They are just experiencing them older.

Denise H
10-06-2009, 08:48 AM
At that age, we don't do extra history, except for reading historical fiction or biographies.

My oldest ds took a standardized test at the end of 4th grade and scored 100%! I was very surprised, because we weren't doing any "formal" history. That year, we did BYFIAR 1 and read a short biography from a book of famous Americans each day. I just thought I'd throw that out there to put your mind at ease about using FIAR. In fact, the times I have tried to add stuff to it, we tend to miss out on the richness of FIAR. HTH!

MichelleTN
10-06-2009, 10:39 AM
We do some extra history but not because I don't think FIAR is good enough. It is very good. Dss just love history.

Most of our history is reading books and History Pockets (http://www.amazon.com/History-Pockets-American-Civil-War/dp/1596732598). My boys love doing the hands on stuff.

Also I just wanted to add that dh is always amazed at how much the boys have learned from FIAR. We will be out somewhere, see something. They will start spouting off facts. Dh will look at me like "is that true?" and I give a slight nod. Then he gets them to tell him more. FIAR is just great.

Heather W
10-06-2009, 12:50 PM
I would not categorize the history in FIAR as tidbits. They can be all out, full monte topics of great discussion and discovery. when you put them all together you come out with a fabulous introduction to many topics and time periods in history!

Rest assured that as your children get older they will revisit what they are exposed to in FIAR in greater detail designed for older students.

I can also guarantee that if you are doing FIAR as it is intended, your 3rd graders is getting FAR more history than the average traditional school student at that age.

The question really is, do you buy into the unit study framework and its ability to give your children a well rounded education? I don't mean to be harsh, but I see this question asked SO often! If you immerse yourselves in these studies it's nearly impossible to come out the other side without enough history. Is it chronological? neat? Precise in how it's delivered? Nope. But it is meaningful and memorable.

Dive into each FIAR study and know that your 3rd grader is getting an excellent education!!

Tracey
10-06-2009, 12:57 PM
I do not add any additional history to FIAR or Beyond. We use the topics that are provided and for us it is enough. My kids love history and have gained a lot of knowledge from FIAR and Beyond.

Rebe
10-06-2009, 01:17 PM
We use FIAR and BY for history through 6th grade. I've always felt that there was plenty there.

My oldest is a big history buff and reads it in his spare time. My dd "doesn't like" history and reads it only if forced, and appears to pay attention with about 10% of her brain even then. When they took the Stanford tests at the end of last year, they both tested extremely high (way above their grade levels) in whatever that category was called -- social studies, maybe?

So I've never felt the need to add either history or science to FIAR or BY!

Cheryl in SoCal
10-06-2009, 01:56 PM
I add a history curriculum in 3rd or 4th grade because I want something chronological. I think it helps with the "big picture" of history better than skipping around. I used Veritas Press for my older boys and will be using Mystery of History with my younger children.

Laura W.
10-06-2009, 05:08 PM
We use a separate history program here. I think there is benefit to having a chronological history program, and I have all my dc learning about the same time period.

But... FIAR does offer a lot of opportunities for teaching American history. And since you're not wanting to do a full program anyway, you might want to choose those FIAR titles that will allow you to cover American history this year. You can do them chronologically or not, whichever you want.

HTH.

Blessings,

Laura

Alice R
10-06-2009, 05:21 PM
I ONLY read Mystery of History.

No projects, no big thing.

They love it and they retain a lot of it actually.

Nancy Ann
10-06-2009, 07:18 PM
I just posted this on another history thread but I think you may find it useful as well. It's a book called All Through the Ages by Christine Miller. It is a list of history living books. It is seperated by age and also chronological history as well. I think with this book as a resource, a library card and a timeline it would be enough for any child. It would certainly be enough before highschool. I have not purchased this book but it's on my list to purchase in the next month or so. I think it would go very well with FIAR and not be alot of extra work like another curriculum.

http://www.nothingnewpress.com/atta.shtml

I have found my timeline to be very helpful. It's amazing how much it's filling up with just our FIAR studies and doesn't take a bunch of more time. I will usually google picures on the internet of something we are studying in FIAR or related to our studies and we put it on the timeline. So far we have done American Revolution, Civil War and Slavery. That is a huge bulk of early american history. Using a timeline will help me to see any gaps and that is where the book All THrough the Ages will come in handy. I can just get a simple book from the library to read out loud and stick an image on the timeline.

If you don't have room for a wall timeline than I recommend the Book of Time from Sonlight. It's a very nice timeline book.

Someone else mentioned the Magic Treehouse books. Not sure if they will be too easy of a read for your child but they have history in them and your child can read them on their own and if they become especially interested in something you can find additonal library books on the topic.

YoLanda
10-07-2009, 01:25 AM
We do add and we use 'A Child's History of the world' by Hillyer. We like it a lot. We've kinda parked in the Greek times because she took a liking to the mythology. I used Hillyer's so she could get a taste of it but since she is excited about mythology I've checked out a few more books from the library and we'll stretch it out that way.

I think we might be moving into American history in Jan. because I like it a lot and I'd like her to have a bit of both each year. We might still read ACHOTW as a read aloud but not really dig into it.

Christy in NE
10-07-2009, 02:11 AM
While I think the links given here are super cool, I really, really think what Heather says is spot on. It's all about building a foundation-planting the seeds! Your dc is introduced to it now, a little more later, even more later, etc...
SO! Much better than the often incorrectly written, dumbed down histroy texts our PS spits out-to only have the dc spit it right back. Our dd is in PS, and everyday I amazed at how LITTLE she does in the most advanced, gifted social studies class our district offers.;)

I say get a timeline, read extra books that tie in with the SS topic, check out some videos-and all will be fine!

:group:

Janee' in Texas
10-07-2009, 10:20 AM
I am one of those who believes in chronological history. I really like the 4 year cycle. However, I am also aware that the children do not always retain so much of that because it is not that relevant to them. That's OK too. I will continue to read through Story of the World or Mystery of History and not expect my under 10 crowd to really master the material, just be familiar with it. They enjoy the story, and it keeps our family together. Now, 10 and up I believe it should be taught chronologically, just as you read every story in order. However, I know that I am in the minority here on that one. ;)

Cheryl in SoCal
10-07-2009, 11:05 AM
I am one of those who believes in chronological history. I really like the 4 year cycle. However, I am also aware that the children do not always retain so much of that because it is not that relevant to them. That's OK too. I will continue to read through Story of the World or Mystery of History and not expect my under 10 crowd to really master the material, just be familiar with it. They enjoy the story, and it keeps our family together. Now, 10 and up I believe it should be taught chronologically, just as you read every story in order. However, I know that I am in the minority here on that one. ;)

That's ok, you're in good company;)

Nedra
10-07-2009, 11:11 AM
I love the living history readers from Queen Homeschool. They are fabulous, and very light (though full of great information) so are easy to add to FIAR.

http://www.queenhomeschool.com/bookpage/bookframe.html