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View Full Version : Diet/Exercise ~ For CJ and Anyone Else Who's Interested



Negin
01-05-2011, 05:11 AM
CJ asked me to share this info that I recently re-organized. I've posted these before. Hope no one is bored of hearing it. I'm no expert! Everyone's experiences and bodies are different. Would love to hear thoughts, comments, etc. This topic really interests me.
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Exercise is wonderful for preventing all sorts of diseases – heart disease, cancer, diabetes, protecting the bones, lifting one’s mood, boosting metabolism, and so on. But in general, for weight loss, exercise is not all it’s made out to be. Lots of research has shown this. In terms of weight loss, diet and aerobic exercise provide only a very marginal benefit when compared to diet alone.
I have numbers to prove it - since I weigh and measure on a weekly basis - the times that I have lost the most weight are when I exercise moderately (not for an hour or more a day, like I used to) and eat MUCH, MUCH less.
My body has changed. It's not the body I had in my teens, 20s, or early 30s. I used to be able to eat that slice of cheesecake AND run 4 miles the next morning AND not ever gain. I can’t do that anymore. :sad:
I have more recently found that that when I exercise intensely for 45 minutes or more per day, my appetite increases. I get the most results from eating much less and exercising moderately – for about 30-45 minutes per day, or at least most days. That's just my experience. Again, I have numbers to prove it.
For me, weight loss is pretty much 80% what I eat and 20% what I do. As with most things in life, the usual 80/20 Principle applies. My dh (and others have said this also), say that it may be more like 90% what I eat. I'm actually am agreeing with that more and more.
When it comes to weight loss, intake is huge. When it comes to overall health and longevity, exercise is essential also.
I no longer exercise for 90 minutes a day, and sometimes not even every day, since it’s not always possible.
I tell myself to exercise for health not necessarily for weight loss. Exercise is not a weight loss solution.

Exercise is important, but it may negatively affect your weight loss for three main reasons:
1. Exercise makes you hungrier, causing you to eat more –
Maybe not immediately, but eventually. Burn more calories and the odds are very good that we’ll consume more as well.
I know that when I exercise very intensely and for more than 45 minutes or so, my appetite can be insatiable.
"The most powerful determinant of your dietary intake is your energy expenditure," says Steven Gortmaker, who heads Harvard's Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity. "If you're more physically active, you're going to get hungry and eat more." Gortmaker, who has studied childhood obesity, is even suspicious of the playgrounds at fast-food restaurants. "Why would they build those?" he asks. "I know it sounds kind of like conspiracy theory, but you have to think, if a kid plays five minutes and burns 50 calories, he might then go inside and consume 500 calories or even 1,000."
Gortmaker and Sonneville found in their 18-month study of 538 students that when kids start to exercise, they end up eating more — not just a little more, but an average of 100 calories more than they had just burned.

2. Exercise causes feelings of entitlement. You may want to reward yourself because you worked out so hard at the gym.
People may think they can eat more, because they exercised for 30 minutes.

3. Exercise does not burn that many calories. Couple that fact with being hungrier and you may eat more calories than you burned. Exercise does help burn calories -- you just can't eat more because of it.
To demonstrate the calorie intake versus exercise principle:
Elliptical training for 44 minutes/500 kcal burned = 1 Honey Bran Raisin Muffin from Dunkin Donuts
Kickboxing for 25 minutes and 272 kcal burned = Grande Starbucks latte with whole milk
Jogging for 60 minutes and 470 kcal burned = 1 slice (1/6 of cake) of Sara Lee Cheesecake, chocolate swirl NY style
Pilates for 30 minutes and 119 kcal burned = 5 pieces of hard candy

To burn sufficient calories to lose one pound of body fat, you might:
Briskly walk a total of 35 miles
Swim moderately fast for 6 hours
Dance for 12 hours
Play about 12.5 hours of golf, carrying your own clubs
Jog for about 29 miles
At the same time, you would need to monitor your eating habits to ensure that you are not increasing your calorie-intake in line with your increased exercise! And we all know that it’s much easier to eat 1000 calories than it is to burn 1000 calories!
If you're looking to control your weight, exercise is the least efficient way to do it. You'd have to run for hours to keep the cookies you ate from adding to your waistline.

“Overexercise—for a variety of reasons—actually makes it harder to lose weight. Overly strenuous exercise—especially combined with insufficient sleep, unrelenting stress, and poor eating habits—can push your body into survival mode, raising your level of the stress hormone cortisol. Cortisol’s job is to boost energy levels by any means necessary. If these levels stay high for too long, cortisol starts breaking down the cells in nerves, muscles, and bones, converting them into energy. In the short term, it’s a rush. In the long-term, it’s debilitating.
Cortisol has another job: storing energy where the body can get at it quickly. And guess where that is? In the most accessible place, biologically—belly fat. Ongoing high levels of cortisol lead to weight gain, fatigue, nervousness, and possibly osteoporosis (loss of bone mass).”

We all need to move more, yet this doesn’t necessarily mean that we need to stress our bodies at the gym. Our leisure-time physical activity (including things like golfing, gardening and walking) has decreased since the late 1980s, right around the time the gym boom really exploded.
Very frequent, low-level physical activity — the kind humans did for tens of thousands of years before the leaf blower was invented — may actually work better for us than the occasional bouts of exercise you get as a gym rat. To burn calories, the muscle movements don't have to be extreme. It would be better to distribute the movements throughout the day – functional fitness such as housework, walking the dog, raking the leaves, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, walking while carrying groceries, walking instead of driving when possible, etc.

It's how much you eat, not how hard you try to work it off, that matters more in losing weight. You should exercise to improve your health, but be warned: fiery spurts of vigorous exercise could lead to weight gain.

http://www.thefactsaboutfitness.com/articles/aerobicexercise.htm

http://nymag.com/news/sports/38001/

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2009/08/27/earlyshow/health/main5269114.shtml

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/11/04/phys-ed-why-doesnt-exercise-lead-to-weight-loss/

There’s a Gary Taubes video where he talks about how when we increase our exercise, our appetites naturally increase to adjust. Conversely, when we reduce our caloric intake, our bodies naturally reduce their energy output to adjust. The video is long, but definitely worth watching! He describes (in general layman's terms) the biochemistry of how weight gain and loss occurs, and it's very valuable information.
http://webcast.berkeley.edu/event_details.php?webcastid=21216

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQbuzsY_34Q

Remember: Weight loss begins in the kitchen!

Luisa
01-05-2011, 09:54 AM
Nice, Negin! :clap:

AngelaS
01-05-2011, 09:57 AM
I have more recently found that that when I exercise intensely for 45 minutes or more per day, my appetite increases. I get the most results from eating much less and exercising moderately – for about 30-45 minutes per day, or at least most days. That's just my experience. Again, I have numbers to prove it.

1. Exercise makes you hungrier, causing you to eat more –
Maybe not immediately, but eventually. Burn more calories and the odds are very good that we’ll consume more as well.
I know that when I exercise very intensely and for more than 45 minutes or so, my appetite can be insatiable.


I have found this to be true for me as well. When I exercise hard for an hour or more I am starving for the rest of the day. So I either end up eating too much or I try not to eat and end up like a zombie. UGH!

Thanks so much for posting all of this info! I can see that I probably need to tweek my current exercise plan. :) I can't wait until grocery day on Friday so I can restock my pantry/fridge with healthier foods - rather than the sweets and junk that has been in ther for the past two months!

CJ
01-05-2011, 01:27 PM
THANK YOU ~ THANK YOU ~ THANK YOU, NEGIN!!!
:clap::clap::clap:

One of the main reasons I'm just doing weights now is that it is simple, brief and won't crank my appetite. However, I will hopefully get a little more toned and firm as I lose weight.

I'm not sure about aerobic exercise - I will figure that out later this year.

Negin
01-06-2011, 04:21 AM
You're all most welcome. It's a great reminder for me also.
Moderation in all things.
Again, exercise is great for toning and looking slimmer overall, as well as health (physical, mental, emotional) :clap:, but when it comes to dropping the pounds ... may not be as effective as we had hoped. :unsure:
I just got the February issue of Prevention magazine. There's an article on this very topic. I never would have thought that they of all people would have an article on this. I'm not a huge fan of Prevention, but I get it anyway, since the choices here are very limited.