PDA

View Full Version : USA Today article about early puberty in girls



MelissaSS
04-11-2011, 04:07 PM
Have you guys seen this (http://yourlife.usatoday.com/parenting-family/story/2011/04/Girls-hit-puberty-earlier-than-ever-and-doctors-arent-sure-why/45989054/1)? :eek: :sad: My sister in law sent it to me, and now I want to go lock myself in a closet and cry. My oldest is seven and overweight, btw. :unsure:

What do we do with this information? I've already been stressing about my dd's weight, but I'm not really sure what to do about it. She played soccer this year, I kick them outside on pretty days, we have an indoor trampoline, she runs around with her sister and brother a lot, although it is true she isn't as active or energetic as they are.

I started my period at 10, and that was early. :sad:

Alice R
04-11-2011, 04:28 PM
Yep, most of the girls we know are getting their period at like 9 or 10. I guess they are starting puberty around 8 or 9?

My son started puberty at about 9?

I know, it is upsetting. :sad:

KristenS
04-11-2011, 05:39 PM
Nine??? I knew to worry about girls, it never even occurred to me to fret about my son ... yikes!

(Sticks fingers in ears and hums loudly)

Gitel in nj
04-11-2011, 05:51 PM
I find it interesting that they do not mention the growth hormones injected into our live stock--which we then eat or drink. This is one of the reasons I insisted on ALWAYS purchasing all our dairy organic and why I purchase most of our meat organic.

BTW. my son did not even begin to enter puberty until about 14...Which is a little bit earlier than my DH did but I got my period at 11--not sure if that factors in..

Also, editing to say that this may or may not be because we ate organic..but it sure did not hurt

WendyW
04-11-2011, 06:21 PM
I've never been able to afford organic meats and dairy, both of which we use plenty of. All my kids have been late bloomers, as was I and every other member of my family.

I'm sure that the hormones are not good for our kids, and they may very well have some effect, but it's one of many factors, not a direct or absolute correlation.

ETA: Gitel, I just now read the article, and I agree with you. They list so many possible factors, it does seem weird that they left that one off.

Some days I just want to wind the clock back about 100 years so we (as a culture) can have a do-over!

Jo in PRC
04-11-2011, 08:36 PM
Hmmm. Now I'm really curious. My dd is 11 (which is when I started) and on the chubby side. But she's just beginning to have some puberty changes. I would have expected her to start much sooner. So I'm wondering if the "delay" is because we live in rural China. Most of the meat we buy is "off the street" so hasn't been enhanced with antibiotics or growth hormones. We get our milk from a local water buffalo which may or may not be tampered with (but is a step up from the boxed milk we can buy that is radiated and usually has a long list of additives). I just think it's a bit odd that she's not early - but I'm NOT complaining.

Heather W
04-11-2011, 08:58 PM
There is much evidence to suggest that the relationship between a girl and her father is a huge factor in when she starts puberty. The healthier it is, the later puberty is.

So, dads...you are important!

Rachel Jane
04-11-2011, 09:31 PM
There is much evidence to suggest that the relationship between a girl and her father is a huge factor in when she starts puberty. The healthier it is, the later puberty is.

So, dads...you are important!

hmmm...I got mine a week shy of 16. If I recall correctly, you were about the same. How was your relationship with your dad?

Gitel in nj
04-11-2011, 09:36 PM
There is much evidence to suggest that the relationship between a girl and her father is a huge factor in when she starts puberty. The healthier it is, the later puberty is.

So, dads...you are important!

I dunno Heather, I had (and still have) a fantastic relationship with my daddy--yet I still started at 11, which, by the way, was in 1971 prior to a lot of this stuff in the food/air etc. I was a pretty average weight child at that point (had been very skinny until I had my tonsils out at 8--and was able to actually taste food :lol:)

Carol S
04-11-2011, 09:46 PM
In contrast, my 13 year old who has been at least overweight and on up to obese since she was young hasn't started yet. I asked the pediatrician whether it's possible to have PCOS if you haven't started yet, and she said it absolutely is. So now we're going to investigate that.

Her dairy has been hormone-free since about age 8. At first I thought maybe that helped, but if she hasn't started for medical reasons, then who knows? But I was afraid she was doomed to start by age 9 at the latest. I'm glad she didn't, but I'm starting to get a little concerned.

Dd nearly 12 is a petite little thing, and has some spotting last month. We're not really sure if that was it or not, but it obviously won't be long. She's 4'9", so we're hoping she puts on a growth spurt here soon!

Heather W
04-11-2011, 09:55 PM
hmmm...I got mine a week shy of 16. If I recall correctly, you were about the same. How was your relationship with your dad?

Love my dad! I was a daddy's girl for sure!

Heather W
04-11-2011, 09:56 PM
I dunno Heather, I had (and still have) a fantastic relationship with my daddy--yet I still started at 11, which, by the way, was in 1971 prior to a lot of this stuff in the food/air etc. I was a pretty average weight child at that point (had been very skinny until I had my tonsils out at 8--and was able to actually taste food :lol:)

11 isn't super early though...

I'm just telling you what I've read. Even that article speaks to the same thing on toward the end.

Gitel in nj
04-11-2011, 10:08 PM
11 isn't super early though...

I'm just telling you what I've read. Even that article speaks to the same thing on toward the end.

interesting...I didn't get to the end of the article since i was just so astonished that they did not mention our food supply :sad:

I suppose 11 is not super early, but I was the first of my friends and it was weird. Of course, i didn't have it for another year after that and remained on a very irregular schedule until I was about 47--not that it is on it's way out, I have it like clockwork..Amazing :eek:

Shelly L
04-11-2011, 10:17 PM
wow, that's early. I think we are 'there' now at age 10, unfortunately. I will say that my daughter has an awesome relationship with her dad, so I don't really see that as a factor for us. Others issues may apply. I started at 12. But 7 or 8??? :eek: Makes me sad....

deleise
04-12-2011, 12:59 AM
There is much evidence to suggest that the relationship between a girl and her father is a huge factor in when she starts puberty. The healthier it is, the later puberty is.

So, dads...you are important!
What? I've never heard that! VERY interesting! How does that factor in?

Shannon P
04-12-2011, 01:27 AM
Interesting article, thanks for sharing.

DD had some spotting at 11yo, but nothing else for close to 2 years. She just recently had her first TOM, complete with PMS.:eek: I thought that was rather young, but I figured it's my time as a mother passing too quickly.

But BO at 3yo!:eek: That's young!

For reference, dd was a preemie, but has been slim for her height since preschool. She's not developing earlier than I did, but she may have hit menstruation sooner. My oldest ds hit puberty at 12yo. My younger ds still has not hit it at almost 16yo.:eek:

Negin
04-12-2011, 04:40 AM
I find it interesting that they do not mention the growth hormones injected into our live stock--which we then eat or drink.
I agree. We can't get organic here, but we drink much less milk than before. The local chicken here is hormone-free and fabulous. We seldom eat red meat. Getting local red meat is a bit of a pain, but much healthier. Dh and I eat local liver. The dog eats it also. :)

I have read repeatedly that the later the first period, the less chance of breast cancer. I was told that the ideal age for starting is 16! :eek: I only know of one person who started that late. Lucky her. :unsure:

Kendra AU
04-12-2011, 07:31 AM
Believe it or not.. they have linked hormones in milk, meat, and other foods with men having um.. womanly styled chests. If it can cause men to have enlarged areas that aren't considered normal for them, I could only imagine what it could do to a little girl's hormones.

Considering we went from cooking our own stuff most of the time to buying gobs of prepackaged chemical laden food it stands to reason that we'd have an adverse effect from it.

That said, wow.. how hard for such a young child to have to deal with soo many changes and emotions!

ETA: And it's not JUST food.. you probably don't want to know about the "stuff" they put in your water, especially since 9-11, in order to protect people from a water based attack... Honestly, the stuff one can find out about their food and such can make you weak in the knees and not give two winks about eating. ;)

Shelly L
04-12-2011, 09:38 AM
What? I've never heard that! VERY interesting! How does that factor in?

My best guess on the father thing is that an emotionally healthy father-daughter relationship leads to emotionally healthy girls, which means less body image issues and better eating/taking care of yourself habits, etc. And obesity is one 'possible' factor in the early onset of puberty, ergo, the dads (they say) play an important role in this. I think it would be difficult to find evidence that it's a 'hard and fast' rule, however. Just too many variables, but in a general sense, it may factor in for some girls. (Just my uneducated 2 cents!! :lol: )

WendyW
04-12-2011, 10:08 AM
My best guess on the father thing is that an emotionally healthy father-daughter relationship leads to emotionally healthy girls, which means less body image issues and better eating/taking care of yourself habits, etc. And obesity is one 'possible' factor in the early onset of puberty, ergo, the dads (they say) play an important role in this. I think it would be difficult to find evidence that it's a 'hard and fast' rule, however. Just too many variables, but in a general sense, it may factor in for some girls. (Just my uneducated 2 cents!! :lol: )


I wonder if the father/daughter relationship has a direct affect on hormone levels? Fatherless girls have a drive to find a male to love and protect them, hence the risky behaviors re: relationships. It's not a stretch to think that it could be a physical drive, not just emotional.

Lindsey Carter
04-12-2011, 10:26 AM
Interesting article. There seemed to be a weight relationship for me. When I started high school I was 4' 9'' and 65lbs. i didn't start my period until 17 !/2. I didn't quit growing until I was 19. I've also heard that if you way around 90lbs or less your period will often stop. :unsure: I'm sure it isn't the only factor, but I believe that it often is one of them.

Linda
04-12-2011, 11:00 AM
No early puberty here, yet! My oldest has some signs of beginning, as in she has a cycle of the grumps followed by some happy days ;), other than that, we are blissfully enjoying the beginning of her teen years w/o all the drama that puberty can induce in a young girl. :)

I started around 14/15 and wouldn't say I had the best relationship w/ my dad. Not a bad one but not a close, nurturing one either. My kids, all of them, have a great relationship w/ dh, so hopefully that will equate to a much delayed onset of puberty. (but not too delayed, coz then we'll have to figure out why :spin: ). We do eat mainly organic, definitely only organic milk and the meat is about 80/20 organic/not organic.

Heather W
04-12-2011, 11:30 AM
I wonder if the father/daughter relationship has a direct affect on hormone levels? Fatherless girls have a drive to find a male to love and protect them, hence the risky behaviors re: relationships. It's not a stretch to think that it could be a physical drive, not just emotional.

ding ding!

We have a winner...according to what I've read on the topic. Well a similar line of thought certainly.

If you've never read anything on how fathers affect their children- particularly daughters, it is really worth reading. Bringing up Girls is one source, but there are others.

Judyn
04-12-2011, 12:00 PM
@heather...the book by Dobson? I have never heard of that connection. Its amazing...and quite sad:sad:

Heather W
04-12-2011, 12:03 PM
@heather...the book by Dobson? I have never heard of that connection. Its amazing...and quite sad:sad:

Yes! Bringing Up Girls (http://mops.christianbook.com/bringing-up-girls/james-dobson/9781414301273/pd/301273?item_code=WW&netp_id=683499&event=ESRCN&view=details)

Christi in VA
04-12-2011, 02:35 PM
Wow!! That is a bit scary.
Me: I had a horrible, just horrible time in school (with boys)due to my early physical development, but didn't begin menstru@ating until 12. I was overweight and no relationship with my father and at around that age, my mom divorced from a stepdad.

My dd: 11.5, great relationship with dh, very thin/tall build, not even near overweight and only minor physical development at this point. Some more 'emotional' days here and there.

We do not do the whole organic thing, just due to finances, but do the things we can.

Loralin
04-12-2011, 08:18 PM
My niece is dealing with this. She has had the implant put in. I think she is on her second implant and she is only 7.:sad: