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YoLanda
04-17-2011, 12:32 AM
As I see more and more Christian world view curriculum pop up, it makes me wonder if it is really necessary. It seems that what our children need to know would come up through living as a Christian, reading the Bible, and having discussions with Mom and Dad. (just for the record, I've not yet looked up what those books/tools promise to cover) Isn't it just life skills/knowledge/life-prep that we as Christian parents would cover in the day to day living? Is it one more area of parenting that we are asking the 'experts' to cover for us?

Or is it just like any other 'parenting' book we might read, like 'Shepherding your child's heart' or using a book for teaching about dating, puberty, and the like?

What do you think?

For those using them, chime in, please, and give the low down on what it does for you and your children. And what you use.

Thanks for your thoughts :hi:

Cindy K
04-17-2011, 01:03 AM
Yes, there is so much out there for worldviews, it is overwhelming. I have been reading through A Biblical Home Education by Ruth Beechick. She refers to John MacArthur who said that he wasn't taught worldviews, he was just taught the Bible.

He has edited a book, Think Biblically, Recovering a Christian Worldview. I am considering getting that for myself. I am hoping that as we along with our Bible study, it will help me guide them. It looks like it is for college age age, but I would consider older high schoolers going through the book at some point.

Jodi B
04-17-2011, 07:41 AM
I also have come to the conclusion that developing a Christian worldview is very important, and the teaching of it is weaved into lessons.

It does not mean that your speak Christianese for everything, but rather demonstrate for your children and discuss with them what the Christian response should be for a situation. A worldview is simply that -- how one views the world. Everyone has a worldview, but where that worldview is rooted in is very different for each person. :unsure:

We have been subscribing to God's World News for the kids and World Magazine for dh and me, for example, and getting the news presented from a Christian worldview has made a difference. Using a Christian-based core curriculum (in all of our cases, FIAR), is another important thing.

Cindy -- thanks for the book recommendation ... I'll look into it as well! :)

Cindy K
04-17-2011, 02:13 PM
Jodi - your welcome ;)

Esther-Alabama
04-17-2011, 02:53 PM
Personally, I steer clear of the curriculum that is marketed as Biblically based. I do not mind if there is a suggested character guide or a Bible study guide to go along with it. But I have found myself turned off by the constant preaching of many of the others.

I want to teach my children science.... Not how to feel about science. I am plenty capable of inserting our own Christian viewpoint into a lesson. My kids are capable of seeing Gods hand in the subjects we study.

I want my children to learn history....not one man's or one group's viewpoint of history.

I completely understand wanting a Christian education for your kids and mine are certainly getting it here at my house. However, I want them to have the values, beliefs, and ideas shared by my husband and me. I have found that many of the Christian world viewpoint programs do not teach my own beliefs, therefore, I stay away.

Better stop now...

Jen in OK
04-17-2011, 04:45 PM
I agree, Esther. Not too long ago, I got a magazine that had an article about teaching math from a Christian prespective. Really? Um...I'm not even sure what to say about that!

I have not ever been to a convention before so there is a lot out there I have not seen, but I would rather insert our values into what we're doing than have to edit out someone else's and put mine in. It just seems like saving a step.

Kim in IN
04-17-2011, 05:24 PM
Well said Esther! I completely agree.

laurie in ok
04-17-2011, 05:54 PM
I have not looked into Christian worldview curriculums and my oldest is only in sixth grade, but I agree that a Christian worldview is taught on a daily basis. I think it's something that is taught very well conversationally as life happens. When we hear things on the radio, news, from friends, etc. it's a springboard for a conversation about why we believe what we believe.

In college I took a Christian doctrines class - and I loved it! It was not a class teaching you what to believe, but a class for studying and deciding what you believed. I would love to go back and find the list of topics that were covered. At the end of the class, we had to write a paper that covered things like baptism, security of the believer, the trinity, etc. We had to write our own statement of faith -with verses to back up what we believed. The point wasn't that the whole class had to agree - but that we each had an understanding of our faith. I would love to do find something open ended like that for my kids when they are older.

Heather W
04-17-2011, 06:08 PM
I agree, Esther. Not too long ago, I got a magazine that had an article about teaching math from a Christian prespective. Really? Um...I'm not even sure what to say about that!

I have not ever been to a convention before so there is a lot out there I have not seen, but I would rather insert our values into what we're doing than have to edit out someone else's and put mine in. It just seems like saving a step.
:lol: My husband said the same thing about that article Jen! I thought it was a stretch.

We also subscribe to God's World News and that magazine is a good starting place for us, but we want to teach our children other sides of a topic as well.

We teach our children with a natural approach to Biblical things and I agree, I don't always appreciate a publisher's point of view on a topic.

It's an interesting idea you bring up YoLanda.

Jodi B
04-17-2011, 07:28 PM
I agree, Esther. Not too long ago, I got a magazine that had an article about teaching math from a Christian prespective. Really? Um...I'm not even sure what to say about that!

I have not ever been to a convention before so there is a lot out there I have not seen, but I would rather insert our values into what we're doing than have to edit out someone else's and put mine in. It just seems like saving a step.

Precisely -- math was the area I thought of in my initial response where the curriculum doesn't need to be Biblically based.

ITA, there are curriculums which are very preachy (vs. demonstrating a Christian worldview) and have questionable theology and bad vibe going through them (i.e., you need to believe exactly as the author does, otherwise your salvation is suspect). :unsure:

Carol S
04-17-2011, 07:46 PM
To me, a Christian worldview *curriculum* is mostly an older grades kind of thing that's pretty philosophical in nature. It's about recognizing places in our thinking that are really based in philosophies that aren't rooted in biblical truth, and recognizing not only that they aren't but also recognizing where they came from. Reading How Should We Then Live was very eye-opening for me, and I want to do something like that with my kids.

But yes, I do agree that thinking biblically is something we teach from day one in how we live and talk, and that that's what we're commanded to do in Deut 6:6-9.

And I also agree that teaching "math from a Biblical perspective" is reaching. I mean, learning the orderliness of creation and cool stuff like how we see the Fibonacci sequence in nature and stuff, well, sure. Cool. But there's just nothing inherently biblical or inherently humanistic about arithmetic! Granted, teaching arithmetic to kids with a math LD has strengthened the prayer life of many of us :perplex: , but division is division. :D

Linda
04-17-2011, 08:06 PM
The Biblical Worldview Curriculum's I've looked at are not, in my opinion, having the experts step in and take over what we could be teaching at home ourselves.

I reviewed (http://alonglifespathway.blogspot.com/2011/03/tos-review-apologia-who-is-god.html)one geared for younger students and liked what I saw from what we got through before the review period was up.

The other one (http://www.cornerstonecurriculum.com/Curriculum/SP/sp.htm) I've looked at is geared for older students (mature Jr. High/highschoolers) and really delves deep into having your student think about why they believe what they do. It systematically goes through a process of developing what your Christian worldview is then has them go through various books and movies and has the student determine what the authors worldview was and how that matches up with what they have determined to be their worldview. It wasn't about shunning modern culture either as you might think by some of the material they are to read/view. It was actually a way to help the student realize that everyone has an agenda and a point of view that they are sharing and to determine what that viewpoint is in comparison to a Biblical worldview. It's a way to become active participants in the world culture rather than passively sit there and be fed someone elses agenda w/o ever thinking about what it is they are trying to tell you.

We've also worked a bit through this one (http://www.cornerstonecurriculum.com/Curriculum/Heart4You/Heart.htm), which I love. It's for middle schoolers and really has helped deepen my kids heart for the Chinese people. :) I need to get working through the rest of it!

My niece and nephew have also attended a Biblical Worldview camp (http://www.summit.org/conferences/student/) that was phenomenal. My niece has gone back every summer on staff since, she loved the experience so much. :) This camp is for highschool Seniors and college aged kids (typically Freshman and Sophmores). I've read things the students there have written and have seen my niece and nephew become even stronger in their beliefs. The why's behind what they believe have become a powerful testimony that I think most Christian's don't ever delve into very deeply.

So yes, as a homeschooling family we weave our views in and out of our daily lives but I wouldn't exclude these resources thinking they are just a way for someone else to teach our kids. From what I've seen, they go way beyond daily life and really have our kids take ownership of their faith. :)

KarenF
04-17-2011, 09:21 PM
Our daily living and interactions that our children observe is the best way to impart a biblical worldview.

I suppose if there is a certain bend to your worldview you would want that- one that goes with your particular denomination-then it wouldn't seem preachy.

I don't think all our studies need to be from a biblical worldview, but, for instance, I will not use a non-biblical science curriculum. We need to have a strong understanding in creationism before I would introduce evolution, for example.

As DS grows and has a greater understanding of logic and reason, then other worldviews will be introduced. It's important to know why we believe what we believe and to have an answer for the hope that is in us. I am of the mindset that it is a disservice to our children to not explain why the bible is true using logic and reason. As the world becomes more and more relativist we need a real answer to the flawed thinking that truth is only what we want to believe.

Donna H
04-17-2011, 09:32 PM
In college I took a Christian doctrines class - and I loved it! It was not a class teaching you what to believe, but a class for studying and deciding what you believed. I would love to go back and find the list of topics that were covered. At the end of the class, we had to write a paper that covered things like baptism, security of the believer, the trinity, etc. We had to write our own statement of faith -with verses to back up what we believed. The point wasn't that the whole class had to agree - but that we each had an understanding of our faith. I would love to do find something open ended like that for my kids when they are older.

We haven't used it, but you're description sounds a lot like Discovering Doctrine (http://simplycharlottemason.com/books/discovering-doctrine-personal-bible-study/) from SCM.

Jen in OK
04-17-2011, 10:52 PM
And I also agree that teaching "math from a Biblical perspective" is reaching. I mean, learning the orderliness of creation and cool stuff like how we see the Fibonacci sequence in nature and stuff, well, sure. Cool. But there's just nothing inherently biblical or inherently humanistic about arithmetic! Granted, teaching arithmetic to kids with a math LD has strengthened the prayer life of many of us :perplex: , but division is division. :D

:lol: When I saw the headline on the magazine, I thought maybe they would approach it from a standpoint of money and debt and being a good steward of what God has given you, but apparently not. Heather, I'll tell Jay he wasn't alone in his opinion! ;)

WendyW
04-17-2011, 10:53 PM
Like others have said, I believe that your worldview is something that is taught daily, and does not need a dedicated curriculum. However, after attending many conferences, where this is often a topic of the seminars, I can see that many feel a need for it.

My own feeling is that when the parents are mature Christians with a solid grasp of what they believe and why, that a curriculum probably is redundant and unnecessary. However, many parents are young Christians and may have been thoroughly steeped in humanistic teaching. These parents are probably very happy to use such a curriculum, not just for their kids to learn, but for themselves. You can't pass on what you do not understand yourself, and way too many churches preach feel-good Christianity, not true Christian living.

Cori~OR
04-18-2011, 01:20 AM
I completely agree with Esther.

I think most people who homeschool use a mix, whether they want to or not, because there is more Christian curriuclum than secular.

I'm afraid that a strong Christian worldview teaches children to think "we are right and they are wrong" and I won't do this to my children.

Robin in Colorado
04-18-2011, 09:23 AM
I agree, Esther. Not too long ago, I got a magazine that had an article about teaching math from a Christian prespective. Really? Um...I'm not even sure what to say about that!

I have not ever been to a convention before so there is a lot out there I have not seen, but I would rather insert our values into what we're doing than have to edit out someone else's and put mine in. It just seems like saving a step.

I agree, Jen. It's important to live your values and to purposefully teach them.

I think we're getting the worldview stuff because there truly is a need. I grew up a Christian in a Christian home, but never knew (neither did my mom) that we are supposed to make decisions in our lives based on what the Bible says, or that we should evaluate things Biblically.

Can I just say that having a worldview of being a "non-Biblical Christian" for many years got me in lots of trouble?

And I see it all around me - people who claim (and I'm not disputing that, btw) relationship with Christ, who go to church every week, who attend Bible study, some are even in ministry, but they don't understand what a worldview is, much less that they have one. They don't understand where, as followers of Christ, they should get their standards and values.

(this is a hard *conversation* to have w/o being IRL ;) )

For generations, US Christians have been complacent and not thought through their worldview or been purposeful about teaching values to the next generation. Some disastrous things have occurred, at the personal level, at the government level, in the church.

It's important to understand what a worldview is, what your own worldview is, and if you are a Christian, if yours matches up with the standard set in the Bible. (for the record, I'm in my toddler stage in this process)

I think that Christian complacency + lack of worldview clarity = marketing niche. :D

One thing I have learned personally is this : Is God all He says He is, or not? Because if He is, then not only do I have to change some of my thinking, I have to change some of my teaching.

Math is an example. If God is God, then no academic subject is neutral. It originated with God, and not with man. If I teach that God created the world (science), that words are important to Him (literature, writing, grammar, Bible, relationships), but that man made math (which is a brick in the foundation of God's design for Creation) or that math is a 'neutral subject', then I have just placed all my teaching on shaky ground. Simply purposing to remind my children that the principals of math are part of creation; that you see math everywhere even in nature; that God created it and we need to understand it as a way to understand Him better - these are simple ways of sharing how God is in *all* His Creation and not just here and there.

Does this make sense? I'm just trying to explain why I think we are seeing this influx of materials, and why the article on "Christian math."

I do think that as Christians, we need to be aware of what a worldview is, and continually evaluate our own to see if it matches up to God's word - not the world around us and not even the Christian culture around us.

An example of that was posted here a little while ago (sorry, I can't remember who posted) when a woman was kicked out of her church because of something she did before becoming a believer. That response may be a part of that particular church culture, but it's not a part of a Christian worldview. There is a difference.

Our worldview is our belief system, and it makes a difference in the way we live our lives, from what time we go to bed to how we vote to whether we speak to our neighbor or not. It's important for all of us to know absolutely what we believe, why we believe it, and what all that is based on.

:) :group:

Jodi B
04-18-2011, 09:44 AM
Math is an example. If God is God, then no academic subject is neutral. It originated with God, and not with man. If I teach that God created the world (science), that words are important to Him (literature, writing, grammar, Bible, relationships), but that man made math (which is a brick in the foundation of God's design for Creation) or that math is a 'neutral subject', then I have just placed all my teaching on shaky ground. Simply purposing to remind my children that the principals of math are part of creation; that you see math everywhere even in nature; that God created it and we need to understand it as a way to understand Him better - these are simple ways of sharing how God is in *all* His Creation and not just here and there.

Agreed -- however, I don't need my math curriculum itself telling my children this (I can and do teach them this order), and sadly, what we would end up with is curriculum with a lot of Christianese in it, which is not necessarily a Christian worldview either, KWIM? :unsure:

Heather W
04-18-2011, 11:03 AM
Math is an example. If God is God, then no academic subject is neutral. It originated with God, and not with man. If I teach that God created the world (science), that words are important to Him (literature, writing, grammar, Bible, relationships), but that man made math (which is a brick in the foundation of God's design for Creation) or that math is a 'neutral subject', then I have just placed all my teaching on shaky ground. Simply purposing to remind my children that the principals of math are part of creation; that you see math everywhere even in nature; that God created it and we need to understand it as a way to understand Him better - these are simple ways of sharing how God is in *all* His Creation and not just here and there.


That's just it though Robin! I don't need a curriculum to keep bringing this up to me.

I simply have to show my children that I believe God is our Creator. Nothing is here apart from him. Even numbers...

But God does give men and women the gifts that produce a lot of things...and to discover the relationships of numbers and the wonders of science- how the world was put together.

The truths of math are part of the ordered Creation.

But I don't feel that I need to have a curriculum tell me how that needs to be imparted to my kids. Plus, it often comes with stuff I don't agree with doctrinally. So often, that type stuff is not Biblically neutral. ;)

Nancy Ann
04-18-2011, 01:58 PM
I have not looked into world view curriculum, in fact when I see that in homeschool catalogs I usually roll my eyes and turn the page!:lol: But that's my bad attitude because I think there is a place for it and who am I to judge where the Holy Spirit works. Maybe there is a need for it and some of us just don't see it because we do things differently. We take a much more organic approach and include God and His teachings in everything we do. It just all comes up naturally.

However, Robin makes an excellent point. I see many Christians in real life that go to church, read the bible and do all the things we believe Christians should do but for some reason it does not affect there life in a deep and meaningful way. The believe in Christ and so they do what they believe God wants them to do. However, there seems to be a "thoughtlessness" in our modern Christian culture. It's like they have taken the bible and created a checkoff list and this is what you do to be a Christian and this is what you don't do. There is no thinking required just follow the rules. It feels like Christ does not penetrate the soul in some people. This is why we are seeing a lot of children coming from Christian homes who get lost once they leave the home. I wonder if all this World View curriculum is a way for us to start becoming "thoughtful" about why we believe what we do and start asking the tough questions.

I think for many families this type of curriculum could be very, very helpful to do this. For instance there have been many conversations on homeschool boards about how some moms need more hand holding with certain subjects and therefore they need a curriculum that does a bit more explaining. However some moms can use a simple guide and come up with all sorts of incredible lessons. Maybe this world view curriculum is the same thing. Maybe for some families they are able to just naturally include this stuff with their curriculum and life and maybe other families need or just plain want and enjoy having a curriculum to go through.

I am sort of thinking on the highschool level this could be good similar to other elective type courses like Psychology or Economics. I think it could be a very thoughtful course that could help to bring up many great conversations.

ETA: I don't mean any condescension in this post for people who use world view curriculum. I don't want to imply that if you use it must be because you are thoughtless Christians. I am just making that point as a reason why this type of curriculum is becoming wide spread and why there is probably a good use for it. This curriculum brings to mind that this is an important topic in our homeschools and how we go about including it either naturally or with a curriculum or with both. I will probably use both.

YoLanda
04-19-2011, 12:10 AM
Wow! Lots of really good opinions to ponder. I love it.

I agree that the basis for some truths taught our children is not completely (or at all) biblically based. ('we've always done it this way'. it worked for me and I'm fine.') That our children need to know how to really hear the opinions that fly so freely in various ways and how to decipher them.

Perhaps it has come from many years of 'Johnny, learn this bible verse. Johnny, read this devotional. Johnny, go to church. Johnny...' and the list goes on, not ever asking Johnny what he thinks of this verse, this devo, this church activiity. Does he agree with it and why. yeah, it's called con-ver-sa-tion.

Perhaps that is why many young Christians who fly the nest no longer have their Christian basis. It was never something they owned and maintained. Now they have the world telling them how it is and they have nothing to argue with against it. That's when they accept it as truth.

This leads me to another thought about teaching the Word in church....probably for another post but it goes with teaching the Truth... I think it would be wonderful to actually just go through the bible, small segments at a time, sittin' on the floor (no desks to separate) in a casual setting and asking the kids what they think about it, how it impacts them, giving them time to think. Not just filling them with the Word but actually having a conversation, like God does with us. hmmmmmmm........ :)

Rachael
04-19-2011, 12:28 AM
I'm unclear about some of the Christian curriculums. Some of them simply seem to marvel at God's cleverness. It's fascinating and amazing; it really is! However, is it worth repeating essentially the same sentiment every page? I find that marveling over God's cleverness is done best outdoors in nature, not in a book.

IDK.

I've found, through history, that I don't necessarily agree with reasons why the authors say something happened. I find myself saying, "Wow, that's complex and a lot of suffering just for this. If God wanted this, here are 4 other ways he could have easily got it. How do we know X led to Y led to Z?"

Maybe I'm one of those Christians that just don't get "worldview". I think God alone knows, and I'll find out many things later. I don't have to come up with an explanation. That's not my job.

Katherine in CA
04-19-2011, 01:24 AM
A great book to read on the subject is "Homeschooling With A Biblical Worldview" by Israel Wayne:

http://www.wisgate.com/hsbwmore.htm

Great article by Answers in Genesis: http://www.answersingenesis.org/docs2005/0502worldview.asp

Good article by Focus on the Family:

http://www.focusonthefamily.com/faith/christian_worldview/whats_a_christian_worldview.aspx

The Barna Group study says that only 4% of surveyed adults have a biblical worldview for their decision-making, and not much higher for church goers:

http://www.barna.org/barna-update/article/5-barna-update/131-a-biblical-worldview-has-a-radical-effect-on-a-persons-life

Good and timely discussions!

Sheri
04-19-2011, 08:17 AM
I'm pretty basic. I just teach what they are interested. God tends to find a way into all of our discussions but it's not something I try to fit. I know He'll find a way in...always does.

Cori~OR
04-19-2011, 08:37 AM
Maybe I am confused as to what "worldview" really means, but I cannot imagine studying history without reading about both sides of the story. This would mean reading from the perspective of a person/people with another belief system. For example, reading "Little House on the Prairie" AND "The Birchbark House" without calling out the ways that Native American spirituality are wrong in God's eyes.

I had somone explain worldview to me and she said that a secular worldview means viewing the world through "things" and a Christian worldview is viewing the world through God. Since I am not materialistic, I would prefer to see the world through God....but it cannot be this simple.

So I go back to my feeling that Christian worldview simply means that you are not going to consider the perspective of a person with a different faith without illustrating the ways in which they are wrong.

Can someone clarify this for me?

Cori~OR
04-19-2011, 09:04 AM
In reading one of the links that Katherine provided, I think I have a good picture of a Christian worldview. And while it contains good things like, "One can do no less than strive to love the Lord thy God with all of one’s heart," it also contains examples of trying to solve societal ills that are part of our "free will."

Government laws are designed to protect people from physical and financial harm (etc.), but not from spiritual harm. Spiritual harm is part of our personal freedoms. Government laws are intended to prevent people from harming others.

So I don't see how a Christian worldview will solve problems in society except to judge others who do not follow God's laws or by trying to make government laws that are clearly a moral issue. Teaching children values is a good thing, but these values should not be forced on others.

The problem that I have with a Christian worldview is that it goes to far. How do you raise non-judgemental children if you are teaching from this perspective and the main purpose of a Christian worldview is to solve societal ills?

I would much rather read the Bible to my children and teach them about God in ways that helps them through life and helps them be kind and loving to other people --not so they can change others to their way of thinking. This, in my opinion, is a "Christian personal view" not a "Christian worldview."

Here is the passage I'm referring to:

"Does worldview matter?
As alluded to above, a biblical worldview has been at the center of many of the world’s greatest contributions to science, human rights, literature, education, medicine and freedom.

For example (and many more could be cited), Johannes Kepler was a profoundly religious individual. He studied both Greek and Hebrew so he could read the Scriptures in their original languages. Among his many noteworthy contributions in astronomy, he discovered three laws of planetary motion, proved how logarithms work and contributed to the development of calculus.

In addition, by all cultural measurements a worldview is important as society tackles controversial topics like abortion, so-called “gay marriage,” (and so on) and tries to resolve them.

As a Christian, your worldview is important to your own Christian sanctification, to the well-being of your family, to the betterment of your community and workplace, and essential to the improvement of your nation’s culture and morality. One can do no less than strive to love the Lord thy God with all of one’s heart.

Unfortunately, there has been a falling away from biblical, moral standards within the church itself. If the church is to regain a recognized standing for moral authority in the arena of public opinion and national dialogue, then it must take a public stand on such things as:

divorce, gambling, use of pornography, excessive consumption of alcohol, child and sexual abuse, and denying the inerrancy and infallibility of Scripture (which, unfortunately, are occurring at almost the same rate in the Body as they do in the at-large culture)

or societal ills will continue.

The church and each member of the Body must become prepared to meet the world head-on and gain the victory promised by Christ (Matthew 16:18). But first, each believer needs to put on the mind of Christ and embrace the biblical worldview as presented from Genesis to Revelation. "

ETA the link for this article. http://www.answersingenesis.org/docs2005/0502worldview.asp

Rachael
04-19-2011, 10:34 AM
So I don't see how a Christian worldview will solve problems in society except to judge others who do not follow God's laws or by trying to make government laws that are clearly a moral issue. Teaching children values is a good thing, but these values should not be forced on others.

The problem that I have with a Christian worldview is that it goes to far. How do you raise non-judgemental children if you are teaching from this perspective and the main purpose of a Christian worldview is to solve societal ills?

I would much rather read the Bible to my children and teach them about God in ways that helps them through life and helps them be kind and loving to other people --not so they can change others to their way of thinking. This, in my opinion, is a "Christian personal view" not a "Christian worldview."



Cori, I'm clearly not the most educated person on this subject, but I'll give my opinion anyway.

The chapter and verse escape me, but essentially- Above all else, love one another. That's my worldview. Jesus = Love. We need to know (and our children need to know) what is right by God. We (and they) need to live it. That is our job. However, our job is not to judge those that do not live the way we do. God is the judge. Our judgment will turn others away, while Jesus's love (through us) will draw people into Christianity. That doesn't mean we can't and shouldn't set boundaries about acceptable behaviors around us and our kids, but it just means that we don't get to act all superior, as if we are perfect and flawless because we are Christians, when we do it.

That's JMHO. And I'm sure it's flawed in many ways, LOL. But that's my "Christian worldview" in a nutshell.

Cori~OR
04-19-2011, 02:37 PM
Cori, I'm clearly not the most educated person on this subject, but I'll give my opinion anyway.

The chapter and verse escape me, but essentially- Above all else, love one another. That's my worldview. Jesus = Love. We need to know (and our children need to know) what is right by God. We (and they) need to live it. That is our job. However, our job is not to judge those that do not live the way we do. God is the judge. Our judgment will turn others away, while Jesus's love (through us) will draw people into Christianity. That doesn't mean we can't and shouldn't set boundaries about acceptable behaviors around us and our kids, but it just means that we don't get to act all superior, as if we are perfect and flawless because we are Christians, when we do it.

That's JMHO. And I'm sure it's flawed in many ways, LOL. But that's my "Christian worldview" in a nutshell.

I agree!! ;)

Jodi B
04-19-2011, 03:19 PM
So I don't see how a Christian worldview will solve problems in society except to judge others who do not follow God's laws or by trying to make government laws that are clearly a moral issue. Teaching children values is a good thing, but these values should not be forced on others.

Everyone has a worldview, whether it is Christian, secular, humanist, satanic, pagan or whatever. A worldview is that -- how do we view the world? How do we process the information or situations we are given?


The problem that I have with a Christian worldview is that it goes to far. How do you raise non-judgemental children if you are teaching from this perspective and the main purpose of a Christian worldview is to solve societal ills?

This is not a Christian worldview. :no: A Christian worldview must be grounded in Scripture -- it is from the regular reading and study of Scripture that we are rooted. It determines how we respond when faced with bad behavior. It helps us develop and grow discernment.

In his book, The Discipline of Spiritual Discernment, Tim Challies does talk about two types of judgments, one being judging peoples' hearts (or what is hidden to us), "personal piety, ... [or] the conscience in matters where Scripture is silent," (79) which we must never do. But then what do we judge? Challis states,


When a doctrine or teaching is presented to me, I may examine it and mull it over. I may compare it to Scripture and seek to understand whether it is consistent with what God has revealed about himself. But once I accept that doctrine I am responsible for it. If the doctrine is false and I choose to believe it, I can expect God to hold me accountable for believing something is false. ... And so I must exercise great caution and great care in ensuring that I accept and approve only that which the Bible teaches. I need to test everything that is presented to me. (80)

It is our society which says to never ever judge. But the Christian worldview does not say that -- there are things which the Bible is clear on what we are not to judge; however, there are things in which it is clear we are to judge.

It is not the main purpose of Christianity to solve societal ills -- we are to spread the Gospel, through word and deed, leading others to Christ. We show people, through our words and actions, that there is a better way. Read the Gospels and Acts (and the letters to the churches), and you will see this in action!


I would much rather read the Bible to my children and teach them about God in ways that helps them through life and helps them be kind and loving to other people --not so they can change others to their way of thinking. This, in my opinion, is a "Christian personal view" not a "Christian worldview."

:yes: This is what we ALL need to be doing. We are to spread the Gospel message -- and we don't do the changing; the Holy Spirit does! ;)

A curriculum is not going to do this for us by itself ... we must be in the Word. Always.

The problem in our society is that too many professing Christians don't have a very well developed worldview or discernment. With that lack, the results have been Christians not looking (or acting) any differently than anyone else, and our collective witness has suffered. :(

Nancy Ann
04-19-2011, 04:30 PM
I think like any curriculum there will be world view curriculum that would probably be less than desirable and may indeed be very judgmental. I am pretty leery of most bible curriculum out there so I assume if I were to use a world view curriculum I would be just as careful and selective.

I think world view curriculum can be good conversation starters for some families and helpful for high school.

Our best friends are involved with the teenagers in their church. He talks about how amazed at how sheltered these kids are. No, they are not homeschooled!:lol: They are all public schooled kids that come from Christian families. He says they are sheltered because they know of nothing outside their own world of school, tv, friends ect...Parents very rarely talk about important things, as they are busy doing their own thing. They have very little REAL knowledge how other people live, like very poor people, or people of other countries. They don't really understand about other religions or churches. At church they learn the bible and sing songs but there is no real application of the bible in their life. He finds it to be a real challenge to get these kids to have not just a belief in God because they are told to, but to actually have God change who they are as people, how they behave and how they think about things.

We also have some family members that are Christian and go to church regularly, but God forgive me for saying this, you wouldn't know it when you talked to them. They have very little knowledge of the bible and many of their decisions about life are worldly, their politics and views on other people are incredibly judgmental. They have no problem applying the bible when someone they know has a baby before marriage!! They completely look down on us for homeschooling, for my husband who has a job that serves God and a job that doesn't pay well, we live in a small home. They just don't get us and we are made to feel like pond scum every time there is a family gathering.

Those articles were very interesting Katherine, especially the one about only 4% of people actually have biblical principles that effect their decisions.