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JennyO
04-20-2011, 10:36 AM
Ladies...

We brought home such a sweet puppy about three weeks ago. She is about 12 weeks old now. She is such a biter right now. And my kids are rather afraid at times to hold her. I am on this puppy like a hawk and training her to stay off my kids at all times. Also, she can even sit on command. So, lack of training is not an issue. We are crate training her and she is out of her crate several times a day for long periods and getting good naps in. Her potty training is going well. She has all sorts of toys too and I try and help her expend energy. Anyway...the biting is a bit of an issue now. She's biting hands and clothes.

Any advice?

Alicia
04-20-2011, 10:49 AM
This is what we did to train our golden retriever not to bite. Every single time he does it, we clamp his mouth together, hold it tightly, and say sternly, "NO BITE!!"

WendyW
04-20-2011, 12:55 PM
Another method is to "yelp" and stop playing whenever his teeth make contact. Supposedly this is they how they learn not to get too rough when playing with other puppies.

If you've ever watched two dogs play and wrestle, teeth are very much a part of their play- with no-one getting hurt. They DO need to learn that teeth are a no-no when playing with kids, but it IS a part of their natural play, not a sign of aggression.

She also may be starting to cut her adult teeth, and will chew on everything till the teeth are all in. You may find baby teeth laying around on the floor. Try different types of rawhide chews (our dogs have loved the pencil-sized ones at this age) and other chew toys and keep her favorites handy to switch out for whatever she is trying to chew on.

Chalane (FL)
04-20-2011, 07:24 PM
We have an adult dog who was nipping at people's ankles the only thing that worked for her was one of those buzzers that only dogs can hear. We were at our wits end when we tried it and it's among the best $20 ever spent. There are a few people she just can't stand and we get the buzzer out, show it to her and that is enough to make her be good. Good luck.

JennyO
04-20-2011, 08:00 PM
Thanks gals! You know, our pup is doing fairly well today!:clap: Last night I was feeling a bit frustrated, hence my email today. But, also last night I really ended up getting on her. I clamped her mouth shut (not meaning to be as firm as I was), and it seemed to register with her that I was super serious. Today she was even more submissive with me, but not fearful. I found some info. today that is working great with our pup too. Here is the site if anyone has a biting pup to deal with:

http://gotjowls.com/bite-inhibition-in-puppies

YoLanda
04-20-2011, 10:33 PM
Dog Whisperer-Cesar Millan.

check them out at the library. They are eye-openers.

WendyW
04-20-2011, 11:11 PM
Dog Whisperer-Cesar Millan.

check them out at the library. They are eye-openers.

I watched a bunch of these when we got our puppy last fall. They ARE eye-openers, but I don't recommend them for young puppies. His focus is retraining dogs that did not have good initial training, and many of his techniques are more forceful than a young animal would need.

They DO show the importance of making sure the dog knows who is "alpha", and show the kinds of things that can go wrong, but I would use these as a cautionary tale, not as puppy training.

Rachel Jane
04-21-2011, 06:49 AM
Another method is to "yelp" and stop playing whenever his teeth make contact. Supposedly this is they how they learn not to get too rough when playing with other puppies.

If you've ever watched two dogs play and wrestle, teeth are very much a part of their play- with no-one getting hurt. They DO need to learn that teeth are a no-no when playing with kids, but it IS a part of their natural play, not a sign of aggression.

She also may be starting to cut her adult teeth, and will chew on everything till the teeth are all in. You may find baby teeth laying around on the floor. Try different types of rawhide chews (our dogs have loved the pencil-sized ones at this age) and other chew toys and keep her favorites handy to switch out for whatever she is trying to chew on.


They ARE eye-openers, but I don't recommend them for young puppies. His focus is retraining dogs that did not have good initial training, and many of his techniques are more forceful than a young animal would need.

but I would use these as a cautionary tale, not as puppy training.

:yes: