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Cate OH
05-18-2011, 06:10 PM
The Psychoeducational evaluation results for my ds where not exactly what I expected. :unsure:

Is there a web-site or book that explains what all the numbers mean? Itís overwhelming!
Some of the test included the WISC-IV, Woodcock-Johnson (WJ-III), Asperger Syndrome (ASAS), Dyslexia Screening (DST-S) just to name a few.

Thanks in advance for any direction you can provide and a BIG hug to you for having walked this road! :group:

Hollie in SC
05-18-2011, 06:29 PM
:group: :group: Hugs and prayers, Cate. Take a deep breath. He is still the same little boy he was yesterday and he'll be that same little boy tomorrow.

I don't know of any sites right off, but I'm sure you can google them and find some info. When you get overwhelmed, stop for a while. It will still be out there when you are ready to tackle it again. Baby steps is the way to approach it.

:group: :group: :group:

Julie Y
05-18-2011, 06:54 PM
:group: :group: as you sort your way through the information!

Cate OH
05-18-2011, 09:24 PM
Thanks for the hugs and the wise words! :group:

Google is not coming up with the information I am looking for, I must be using the wrong words.

Off to relax and let it go... or at least try :)

Esther-Alabama
05-18-2011, 09:35 PM
Put the test down for a while and look at your precious boy. He is exactly who God made him to be. Figuring out his weaknesses is a good step, not a bad one. Sit down and make a list of his strengths.

As far as the numbers, what exactly did the evaluator say they mean? Do you disagree with the findings?

I probably had to read my ds's evaluation four times through before it made any sense at all. I had to remove my emotions from it, too. It is a hard thing to hear your child's weaknesses spelled out in black and white so clinically, too.

Wish I could help you with the numbers! :group:

Melissa Crabtree
05-18-2011, 10:02 PM
:group: One of my responsibilities as a special ed teacher was to interpret those results for people. I wouldn't mind PMing you my phone number or just emailing back and forth and trying to help you understand it all.

Sometimes it's so hard to get answers, but once you can settle in them, it can help to know what you're dealing with. At least that way you can know where to go from here... just don't believe anyone who says, "He'll never (insert skill here)." Only God knows what he'll do, and it will probably be a whole lot more than a test will project. :group:

Alice R
05-19-2011, 11:26 AM
I can also interpret most test results. If you want to post them, I know a lot of us can explain them. You can PM them to me or like Melissa said, you can call me or scan me the report.

In the report, there should be some type of explanation telling you what the mean is and how many standard deviations below the mean your child falls. How many standard deviations they fall below determines the significance of the delay and how much state/insurance therapy they are entitled to.You can also call the examiner and have them explain it to you. I get calls sometimes and I'm more than happy to explain it.

Tests are guides. In our society, we need to know approximately how children fall so we know how to help them and most importantly, who is going to pay for it (it all comes down to money). We do need a (somewhat) objective starting point or we would have chaos trying to get children help.

However, tests don't explain everything or test everything or even represent who your child is every day. It is simply a snapshot in time.

They are often necessary is our modern society but it is NOT who your child is. Your child is a child, not a test score. Every good evaluator knows that and if they don't, they are stupid. :lol:

I test kids all day every day and sometimes the tests just plain stink. I see things that a test cannot test, both positives and negatives. I get children with Aspergers who clearly need speech therapy and they test way way way high and are eligible for zero. I get infants with brain damage who test normal too. I get kids who the tests do represent pretty well. It's a mixed bag and I'm not even the parent...


Feel free to e-mail or Pm or call any of us.

Cate OH
05-19-2011, 05:46 PM
Thank you for taking the time to reassure me and make me smile!
I REALLY needed it! More than you know! :hcry: :group:

The Dr. gave a great overview of the diagnoses (not the details). She was very willing to meet again. It's not that I don't agree with the results, I just wanted to go over the results at my own pace and make peace with them.

Itís the little things that I want to know about.
Like what does a bead threading score of 3 on the Dyslexia Screening Test (DST-S) mean and what skill does that represent?!?!?! Or a Social score in the 2%ile on the Asperger Syndrome Diagnostic Scale, is that the top 2% or the bottom 2%?!?!?

I feel the need to know the ins and outs so I can guide my child. Is that a normal mom response or am I making too big of a fuss?

Tiffany
05-19-2011, 09:53 PM
So glad you were able to get some of the information you are looking for. You are definitely not making too big a deal about it~ you had your son go through this for a reason and it is important that you glean all you can from the results. Hoping that you find the rest of your answers very soon. I do understand about taking the time to emotionally work through this. What Hollie said is very true, he is the same boy he is before the testing. This is a tool to help you make his life better. Blessings to you and your family.

Alice R
05-20-2011, 11:47 AM
Itís the little things that I want to know about.
Like what does a bead threading score of 3 on the Dyslexia Screening Test (DST-S) mean and what skill does that represent?!?!?! Or a Social score in the 2%ile on the Asperger Syndrome Diagnostic Scale, is that the top 2% or the bottom 2%?!?!?



I don't know about the bead threading.

on the tests that I use, a percentile of 2 means that 98 out of 100 children will score higher than him.

I believe that is the same for all tests but since I'm not a statistician.... ;)

Alice R
05-20-2011, 11:48 AM
No, you are not making a fuss. You want to know what the test actually tested and how your child did.

Cate OH
05-20-2011, 11:57 AM
Thanks Alice! :)
The % info helps a lot and so does knowing it's OK to want details. I was starting to think I was crazy!

Alice R
05-20-2011, 04:24 PM
Generally each test is sectioned off to test different skills.

For example, my test tests overall language but I can look back and see if the child had more trouble with syntax or morphology or vocab or what. I can tell you where the child fell apart and when the child did OK. Sometimes it's a little scattered also and there are no clear answers.

My husband is an OT and I can look at his testing sheets and see if a child had trouble specifically with visual motor, grasping or whatever.

The examiner has to get their orignial test booklet to answer your questions but they are not unreasonable questions, however, 99.9% of parents won't bother to ask them...but that doesn't mean it is crazy to ask them. I would ask them if I wanted to know.

There should be a percentile, standard score and standard deviation. Do the evals have those things listed?

Cate OH
05-21-2011, 02:10 PM
There should be a percentile, standard score and standard deviation. Do the evals have those things listed?

No, not that I see, unless it is worded different.

Thanks for all your hand holding! :kiss:
I better make a follow-up appointment so I can move on and NOT be stuck on the details!

Alice R
05-21-2011, 02:18 PM
It can be called a composite score also.

TonyaP
05-21-2011, 02:56 PM
Jumping in...
If we're told that "average" is between 1 and -1 on an ADHD test, what would -7 be as far as the total range? Does it go from 1 to -10 or further? Just wonderin' :unsure:

Alice R
05-22-2011, 03:54 PM
Tonya,
I don't know. Is there anything else on the explanation part or the summary? To me, -1 to 1 means that the average is between 1 standard deviation above the mean and below 1 standard deviations below the mean. But that doesn't make sense with a -7. :unsure:

I am surprised that people write up reports with no explanation. In NYC we are mandated to put in a paragraph explaining each test and interpreting the scores in English. (Ok, no I'm not really surprised, nothing surprises me anymore)

Cate OH
05-22-2011, 09:25 PM
Hugs Tonya, it is so frustrating! :group:

Alice, thanks again for sharing your knowledge! Some of the tests show a composite score, some do not. Not one shows a standard deviation. :unsure:
It also amazes me that there are no explanations (that I can find) on-line.

Alice R
05-23-2011, 09:22 AM
I don't think you'd find too much online.

You can try to look up the actual test from the publisher catalogue and they will give you a description of what the test actually tests and how scores are reported.

I believe a composite score is "the" score. There should be something comparing that score to other children his age. If there isn't, that is not right.

Cate OH
05-24-2011, 11:48 AM
I don't think you'd find too much online.

You can try to look up the actual test from the publisher catalogue and they will give you a description of what the test actually tests and how scores are reported.

I believe a composite score is "the" score. There should be something comparing that score to other children his age. If there isn't, that is not right.

The publisher did have a pretend results test on-line and it was more detailed. Thanks for pointing me in that direction.

One more question and I promise (maybe :D ) to let it go...

Do most results tell you things like mild, moderate or severe dyslexia or just state dyslexia, period, and leave it at that?

Alice R
05-24-2011, 07:39 PM
I don't know but on my speech tests and my husband's OT tests, there is a guide to tell you "very poor, poor, below average, above average". One articulation test does not have it, now that I think about it. :unsure:

Sometimes I put it on and sometimes I don't. If the child is very impaired and it is very obvious, I don't think it's necessary to rub salt in open wounds. I'm sure a parent of a seriously delayed child already knows that and doesn't need to see "very poor" written all over the report 10 times and the low score speaks for itself.
If the child needs therapy and I'm trying to make a case for it, yes, I put it all in there to make a point with the state. Children with "invisible" disabilities often need to really to be advocated for, ya know?

Dyslexia specifically, I don't know. You really need to know how the test interprets itself. I don't know how you can hand in a report and not explain that to the parent. Let's not even go there.

Cate OH
05-25-2011, 09:41 PM
:group: Thanks again for helping me! :group:

A follow-up visit is the best route. I need to put this behind me so we can move forward.

Alice R
05-31-2011, 12:05 PM
Take the reports and a highligher and make notes.

I've had parents do that at meetings and it makes the state rep. very nervous, which I find to be hysterical. :lol:

Seriously, just highlight what you want clarification on and take it from there.

I'd do exactly that. ;)

Cate OH
06-01-2011, 04:09 PM
Got my highlighter ready to go! :D
Great tip, thanks! :clap: