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View Full Version : Terrible listener or CAPD?



Melissa Crabtree
06-26-2011, 01:31 PM
How can you tell the difference? Jacob's listening skills have always been less than stellar, but when I see him in large groups with peers it is glaringly obvious. (He is the only one out of 15 kids who doesn't understand directions for relays or games, for example). He has many of the characteristics, but I think because of some of his intellectual strengths he copes well and adapts in those areas. Auditory input is not only not his learning style, I'm learning it's actually a distraction to his comprehension. (My mom and I are both this way. We can't stand being read to.) I have noticed this for some time, but his test scores confirmed what I thought I was seeing. His scores in areas that the websites mention on the characteristic lists are low enough to look like learning disabilities compared to his ability.

I guess I'm asking if it matters if this is CAPD or just poor listening skills? I got his test scores back and his listening skills score was significantly lower than everything else by a very large margin. (I was struggling to not laugh out loud at how confident he was in his wrong answers when I tested him on the listening portion! :lol:) And is there a way I can help him develop his listening skills? (I know I can help him adapt, but can I help him strengthen them?)

I think the reason I'm wondering is that if he's just not a strong listener, I'll just wait for his skills to mature and try to encourage him in that area. If he has a true processing disorder, I would alter the way I'm teaching to maximize his comprehension and retention of information. I'm not explaining this well. I'll alter the way I'm teaching anyway, but immaturity compared to functional disability just seems like something I should know.

Rosemarie
06-28-2011, 08:45 AM
If my life ever slows down, we're hoping to take our ds for an auditory processing evaluation. I've had similar questions.

I did buy Earobics Home Edition in the hopes that it might help. I'm hoping that there will be more time for ds to play after crops are in, etc.

Do you get HSLDA's struggling learner newsletter? I just saw June's email copy today and would be glad to forward it to you. It was all about auditory processing.

I picked up a fabulous book at our homeschool convention, "The Mislabeled Child" by Eide. I haven't gotten very far in it but thus far it has been very good! Looks like it will have many tips for parents.

Melissa Crabtree
07-02-2011, 02:47 PM
I did buy Earobics Home Edition in the hopes that it might help. I'm hoping that there will be more time for ds to play after crops are in, etc.

Do you get HSLDA's struggling learner newsletter? I just saw June's email copy today and would be glad to forward it to you. It was all about auditory processing.



I'd love it if you'd forward that letter to me! I'm going to look at that Earobics thing too. The more I read the more I think this is the missing piece for Jacob. I think his abilities help him cope so it's not as obvious, but it's soooooo obvious to his mama! :lol: I may try and make an audiology appointment. It would be helpful to know if this is it for him, and it would probably make me a lot more patient with his chronic "forgetting.".

KathleenM
07-07-2011, 04:13 PM
My eldest dd was diagnosed with CAPD, and we did a few years of speech/language therapy and Earobics. There are two parts to Earobics for kids - at least there were when we were in the market for it. Part one is articulation, and not what will help out in this case. Part 2 works on the auditory processing skills, and was recommended by our audiologists.

A lot of what you do with a kid like this is employ certain learning strategies, and this means to primarily make learning as multi-sensory as you can. My daughter does well with diagrams, graphic organizers, videos, books with lots of pictures, etc. These kids learn better in a quiet environment, which means no music playing in the background! One trick to help filter out background noise is to have your child read or under his breath, or whisper the steps as he works a math problem.

For something with multi-step instructions, the best bet is the write it down in bullet points. Use highlighting as lots of color whenever possible. These kids are often mistaken for ADHD, or maybe it is that there is a lot of overlap. They have trouble filtering out distractions, primarily auditory, and it makes them appear scatterbrained and inattentive. I think there may also be a sensory component, because prolonged exposure to a noisy environment can get them overwhelmed.