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Carol S
01-09-2012, 11:38 AM
12 yo currently has a bent toward science, which, unhappily, is the subject most likely to get skipped at our house. I am making steps to correct this. Currently, she is finishing up what is supposed to be the first year of The Rainbow. I think we will then stop and do Exploring Creation with Astronomy and perhaps beef it up a little. Then I'll have her do what's intended to be the second year of The Rainbow, but she'll do it in much less than a year.

But I need to decide what to do next. The most obvious thing would be to enter an Apologia track, and I may indeed do that. I will probably outsource some of it, and Apologia texts will certainly be the dominant resource in homeschool high school classes around here.

But I do have something nagging at me. If she does indeed pursue science in college (she's 12 year old and in 7th grade, so she obviously could change her mind about that), I don't want her science in high school to have been so creation-oriented that she is ignorant of dominant scientific theory.

How well do Apologia high school products address other world views? I guess I'm looking for assistance in helping her learn how either to answer objections or ignore them while she's still with us. It isn't my goal to create a young-earth-creationist apologist who forcefully takes on her mean ol' atheist college professors. (If she wants to be that girl, that's fine too. Up to her.) I just want her to know what's coming.

Am I making any sense?

Anyway, does Apologia help students find a balance, or is it so ideological that a student who has had only those texts may be thrown for a loop in college?

And if I decide it's not for us, what are some high school science alternatives?

TonyaP
01-09-2012, 02:21 PM
I am letting DS take a secular computer-based science class. He knows what we do and do not agree with so this is his exposure to the "popular" worldview science. We are using the full Plato course set purchased through Homeschool Buyers Coop but they offer just the science courses as well. Discover offers science classes through hsbc too.

There are live online courses in science offered through Currclick if you want an actual teacher available to you. Or- you could just let her read a secular science textbook and contrast and compare it to her own book. :)

Rebe
01-09-2012, 04:48 PM
Oh, yes, you are making sense. :yes: This was my goal, too.

My dc are using Apologia (at learning center) and they both like it a lot. My dd likes it so much that she recently requested to do an independent study on the fossil record (not to prove anything but because rocks are interesting to her) ... so I expanded that to cover the Creation/Evolution debate. About 10 minutes ago, she and her brother just finished watching Expelled (the Ben Stein documentary), which explores all sides really well.

I'm really careful about choosing books that don't shy away from the theory of evolution, no matter how creationist they are. Apologia science (Wile's books; I haven't looked at the younger level books) definitely talks about evolution, uniformitarianism/catastrophism, etc. He presents all sides and then tells you why he believes such-and-such is true. As for other reading, when I requested books for her independent study, our library had countless books on all aspects of evolution, and one book on "dinosaurs by design." So you won't have any trouble finding resources on evolution. They'll be very biased -- they certainly only present one point of view.

So anyway, yes, Apologia is balanced. He's clear about his views, but he presents all sides.

Carol S
01-09-2012, 08:54 PM
Thank you. That is helpful. A friend has General and Biology, and I'm going to look them over, which will obviously help as well. I really appreciate the feedback. Tonya, I'll take a look at those as well.

Lisa in AL
01-09-2012, 11:18 PM
Oh, yes, you are making sense. :yes: This was my goal, too.

My dc are using Apologia (at learning center) and they both like it a lot. My dd likes it so much that she recently requested to do an independent study on the fossil record (not to prove anything but because rocks are interesting to her) ... so I expanded that to cover the Creation/Evolution debate. About 10 minutes ago, she and her brother just finished watching Expelled (the Ben Stein documentary), which explores all sides really well.

I'm really careful about choosing books that don't shy away from the theory of evolution, no matter how creationist they are. Apologia science (Wile's books; I haven't looked at the younger level books) definitely talks about evolution, uniformitarianism/catastrophism, etc. He presents all sides and then tells you why he believes such-and-such is true. As for other reading, when I requested books for her independent study, our library had countless books on all aspects of evolution, and one book on "dinosaurs by design." So you won't have any trouble finding resources on evolution. They'll be very biased -- they certainly only present one point of view.

So anyway, yes, Apologia is balanced. He's clear about his views, but he presents all sides.

I agree with Rebe. My ds has used Apologia General, Physical, Biology, and is currently in Chemistry. I would say he has a balanced view. Opposing views are thoroughly covered in the general science text if I remember correctly. I wanted my dd to use the Apologia General science text for that reason but she is more of an Abeka kind of girl.

Leslie Nelsen
01-09-2012, 11:23 PM
I agree with Rebe. My ds has used Apologia General, Physical, Biology, and is currently in Chemistry. I would say he has a balanced view. Opposing views are thoroughly covered in the general science text if I remember correctly. I wanted my dd to use the Apologia General science text for that reason but she is more of an Abeka kind of girl.

Agreeing here too. My oldest took 3 Apologia biology courses in High School (We did Spectrum Chemistry.)

Loree'
01-10-2012, 12:03 AM
Another fan of Apologia! :yes:

Another favorite is the Usborne Internet Linked Science Encyclopedia. Highly recommend getting the hardback. Our boys completely wore out the paperback. We ended up buying 2 hardbacks to keep them from fighting over it. :lol: Topics cover everything from energy/matter/light to physics to anatomy to plants, etc. You go to the website tell it which book you have, which page you're on & it directs you to websites that correspond to the topic. When we covered anatomy, the boys watched a virtual knee surgery. They did interactive physics experiments. There were some great things in weather. I'm just too tired to remember what they were!

Adrianne in IL
01-13-2012, 12:48 PM
Have you heard of the Virtual Homeschool Group? There are FREE online classes for Apologia. Perhaps that would be helpful to your family? I have not personally used it but I have heard good things about it.

http://www.virtualhomeschoolgroup.com/

Heather (WI)
06-05-2012, 01:37 PM
:hi: Carol!! Great to "see" you again here (as well as on FB)! :)

I agree with the previous posters about Apologia. Our dd LOVES it, partly because it DOES explain the opposing viewpoint (and then points out, with evidence, why he believes in creationism). She will not let me sell any of our previous Apologia science books (from the elementary up through Biology for the coming year), because she loves them so much. (And this is a kid who does NOT love school much at all--but she loves her Apologia!) ;)

Susan Seaman
06-05-2012, 03:25 PM
Well, I'm going to be the lone dissenter here and say that I found Apologia to be biased - not truly balanced. That said, I used it and was pleased with it. Wile did represent both sides (so WAY more balanced than a secular text would be), but I wanted my kids to consider some other viewpoints a little more. I had intended to let Rebecca read some books during her high school years on the young earth vs. old earth debate and such, but I didn't get around to it. Something to do better with my younger kids. I just feel that in all 12 years Rebecca was only exposed to books that taught young earth creationism. It wasn't my intention to be quite that biased.

I heard a podcast the other day on Ryan Dobson's "Grounded Radio." He did an interview with a physicist who wrote a book "Modern Physics - Ancient Faith." I'm thinking of assigning that book to my sons during high school, but I'm going to read it myself first. The author is definitely old earth creationist, and I liked a lot of what he has to say.

My daughter will be taking College Biology next year. Maybe they will balance her!

KathleenM
06-05-2012, 05:49 PM
Another favorite is the Usborne Internet Linked Science Encyclopedia. Highly recommend getting the hardback. Our boys completely wore out the paperback. We ended up buying 2 hardbacks to keep them from fighting over it. :lol: Topics cover everything from energy/matter/light to physics to anatomy to plants, etc. You go to the website tell it which book you have, which page you're on & it directs you to websites that correspond to the topic. When we covered anatomy, the boys watched a virtual knee surgery. They did interactive physics experiments. There were some great things in weather. I'm just too tired to remember what they were!

Glad I read this - I love the idea of this encyclopedia! Sounds like it may be just the thing for someone here! ;)

Linda
06-05-2012, 06:05 PM
We like the Apologia jr high/highschool sciences as well. Every author is going to have a bias, that's one of the things I'm teaching my kids as they read various books, "Where is the author coming from". I think Wile does a great job exposing them to other viewpoints but is very unapologetic in his stance on young earth creation.

As far as being exposed to evolution, you can't go anywhere w/o being exposed to it! :spin: We were on the train ride at Disneyland and there was a section you ride through that has evolution. :crazy:

Other books you might want to look at are ones published by Hugh Ross. He's an old earth creationist who recently debated Ken Ham. I haven't watched the video, I don't really care to hear them debate their ideas, but that might be another thing to have your kids watch just to hear the different sides of the creationists debate, old vs new.

We also throw in Living Books w/ our science books. These are books about the scientists, theories, etc. For the older years they are usually biographies and nature study type books.

Rebe
06-05-2012, 08:43 PM
The thing I like about Apologia is that he freely admits his bias. He says that every scientist is biased, whether he or she admits it or not. I think this is absolutely true. So he is biased, he tells why, but he also explains "the other side."

Linda is right -- evolution is everywhere and I really think it would be impossible to grow to adulthood (unless you live in a cave) without learning about it to some extent. Or unless a parent is trying very hard to shield a child from all knowledge of evolution, and I don't think anyone on this thread would think that's a good idea to do.

Carol S
06-07-2012, 10:03 AM
Wow, Heather, thanks for bumping up the thread!!

13 yo will be taking a class through a local hs group using Apologia Physical Science this next year. I'll go ahead and get Apologia Biology for 14 (nearly 15) yo as well. I hope she'll make it into a class at the same place, but it's full right now. I think she's very high on the waiting list. So I'll be seeing those books for myself very soon. :D

Thanks for the other resources mentioned. And I remember now that Sonlight has some old earth creation stuff, so maybe I can find out something there, though I've never actually used Sonlight.

Linda
06-07-2012, 10:09 AM
Someone on a yahoo loop I'm on posted this (http://corefoundations.wordpress.com/scheds-math-science/) for science schedules. It looks really good. :thumb:

There are various science curriculums listed, including all the Apologia ones. The schedules include reading assignments, OYO ? assignments, Lab assignments and include materials needed for each lab. It's one of those things I would do, if I knew how! ;) :lol: My kids just get it typed out on a word doc! :D

Heather (WI)
06-07-2012, 03:00 PM
Wow, Heather, thanks for bumping up the thread!!

13 yo will be taking a class through a local hs group using Apologia Physical Science this next year. I'll go ahead and get Apologia Biology for 14 (nearly 15) yo as well. I hope she'll make it into a class at the same place, but it's full right now. I think she's very high on the waiting list. So I'll be seeing those books for myself very soon. :D


Sounds good, Carol! Our dd is 14 (15 in September) and will be doing Apologia Biology, too. Your hs group class sounds like a huge blessing!! Let us know how it's going. :)

Heather (WI)
06-07-2012, 03:02 PM
Someone on a yahoo loop I'm on posted this (http://corefoundations.wordpress.com/scheds-math-science/) for science schedules. It looks really good. :thumb:

There are various science curriculums listed, including all the Apologia ones. The schedules include reading assignments, OYO ? assignments, Lab assignments and include materials needed for each lab. It's one of those things I would do, if I knew how! ;) :lol: My kids just get it typed out on a word doc! :D

Linda--thanks!! Those look GREAT!! I wish I would've seen this before spending $15. for the Apologia science lesson plans from MFW (which has the same daily-type schedule). :)
Maybe I can just use this for Chemistry next year! :D