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ShelleyW
02-07-2012, 04:50 PM
My dyslexic dd is really having trouble identifying words that rhyme, identifying which word has a targeted sound (ew in threw etc) and discriminating between which word is different (lay, lay, lie, lay). Do you have any ideas on activites I can do with her to improve this? We are currently working through Earobics but she is really frustrated and seems to be stuck on the same level every day.

Thanks!

Hollie in SC
02-22-2012, 07:27 AM
Hi, Shelley! Were you able to find anything?

ShelleyW
02-22-2012, 07:52 AM
No Hollie, not yet. I have been looking at some resources from LinguiSystems but it is hard to figure out just from the samples what I need. I will just keep researching until I come across something.
Thanks for asking!

Hollie in SC
02-22-2012, 08:03 AM
:group:

TonyaP
02-22-2012, 02:03 PM
If you can find a copy of Phonics Awareness and Phonics Toolkit by Mark Pennington, it might have some ideas for you. The exercises, particularly in the second portion of the book ask the student to identify particular sounds in the word, etc. I've not actually tried it, but had a downloaded copy so looked through it this week while searching for something new to use with my littles.

I'm pretty sure I received my copy as a free download sometime so you might browse around.

AmyinWI
02-22-2012, 08:44 PM
my dd 8, has problems with this too. She frequently says the wrong form of a word, which could be (our ST told us) from growing up in the inner city and hearing the slang talk .. there's a ST term for it that escapes me right now.

But it's not just that, she misses the endings on words. For example, when I do her spelling lesson with her ( Sequential spelling) the word might be something like "jumped" but she leaves off "ed" . She knows how to spell words with "ed" endings, yet she leaves them off.. same for "ing" "es" and "er" endings.
It happens frequently,so I know it's not just a rare forgetting.. and when I bring it to her attention she can spell it wiht the ending.

What don't you like about earobics? I was going to order that for her, per her ST recommendation (that was a year ago) I don't know if they have higher levels though.

ShelleyW
02-23-2012, 03:05 AM
Amy, I do like Earobics but I can see both of my kids really struggling w/sound discrimination. It is obvious they need lots of work in this area so I am looking for more in addition to Earobics.

Thank you Tonya, I will look into those books.

TonyaP
02-23-2012, 01:41 PM
Just saw this program recommended on another message board:
http://www.jwor.com/

You can watch a demonstration video to get a feel for the program.

ShelleyW
02-23-2012, 07:51 PM
Thank you Tonya,
I will check it out tonight. :)

Amy Joy
03-20-2012, 08:03 PM
my dd 8, has problems with this too. She frequently says the wrong form of a word, which could be (our ST told us) from growing up in the inner city and hearing the slang talk .. there's a ST term for it that escapes me right now.

But it's not just that, she misses the endings on words. For example, when I do her spelling lesson with her ( Sequential spelling) the word might be something like "jumped" but she leaves off "ed" . She knows how to spell words with "ed" endings, yet she leaves them off.. same for "ing" "es" and "er" endings.
It happens frequently,so I know it's not just a rare forgetting.. and when I bring it to her attention she can spell it wiht the ending.

What don't you like about earobics? I was going to order that for her, per her ST recommendation (that was a year ago) I don't know if they have higher levels though.

Amy, I would just like to encourage you that my dd 8 does this at least once a test. We also use sequential spelling. She was in ST from 4-7. this is the only 'problem' left, but it was never addressed by ST and I don't know if I would have connected it.

On a similar, but different note, I was wondering if either of you can tell me more about earobics? My ds6 has a lot of speech issues one of which he can't 'hear' the difference between hard and soft sounds. For example b & p are all b's and g & k are all g's.

Thanks for any help.

Shannon P
03-20-2012, 10:45 PM
Amy, have you had him evaluated by an audiologist for hearing loss? In the examples you give, he replaces the quiet unvoiced sounds with their louder voiced mate. A screening in a doctor's office could still miss a hearing loss because those sounds occur below most screening thresholds.

Leaving the endings off words might also indicate a hearing loss. The /s/ sound that we use to make plurals and possessives is a particularly difficult sound to hear because of its volume and frequency, just as the other unvoiced sounds in your example. Likewise, the d/t pairing that are both represented by "ed" to make past tense verbs often get dropped.

Amy Joy
03-20-2012, 11:17 PM
He was evaluated when he was 3, and they said he was fine, but I don't know how they knew since he refused to do many of the activities. Maybe I should ask for another check as he does leave the endings off some words. For example I have a hard time telling if he says do/don't.
The speech therapist says his voice is never 'off', he always uses the voiced version of the letters. It's hard b/c we've been working on p/b for months and it doesn't matter what I do he insists I'm saying the same word, ex bat/pat, or even pickle/bickle.
Thanks for your ideas.

Cori
03-21-2012, 01:56 AM
Reading Reflex and Phono Graphix. I started this and now wish we'd done it from the beginning. Phonics have not helped my son. He is not hearing all the sounds in words.

Phonics has about a 33% failure rate and whole word instruction has a 44% failure rate. Studies for Phono Graphics show 100% (according to the book).

Since we've been using it, it's not long, he is spelling better. It talks about sound pictures (letters) instead of letter names.

It's supposed to work with dyslexic kids and is based on Orton Gillingham I think. Anyhow, my special ed teacher friend who has also taught adults to read highly recommends it.

And it starts out working with sounds. I know my son is so frustrated with the rules and all the exceptions, like when two vowels go walking the first one does the talking.

Also Headsprout taught him to say blends together liks 'FR' is "fir" and he can't break it up now to spell it, and he doesn't always notice the two go together when reading. The phono graphix they teach them the vowel blends as one sound. There are fewer to remember that way. It all makes so much sense, I'm sorry I listened to the phonics hype.

ShelleyW
03-21-2012, 07:50 AM
I have Earobics that both my dd and ds are using. I think it has definitely helped with their sound discrimination. They are super frustrated sometimes b/c I don't think they realized how bad it was. Earobics is like a computer game w/5 different areas of focus and you earn dots in each category once you have mastered a concept. It is by no means easy for someone who struggles with this so the rewards are hard to come by in the beginning. After about 6 weeks of doing it, I can see results. I do recommend the program.

Cori
03-21-2012, 05:43 PM
Oh, OK thanks. I'll check it out. Reading Reflex has plenty of activities ideas since you asked for that...

TonyaP
03-26-2012, 05:26 PM
Found this resource while browsing today:
http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/phonetics/#