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Rebe
04-03-2012, 07:35 PM
I recently suggested a workshop at our homeschool conference next year regarding how to prepare your non-academically-oriented, non-college-bound student for a good job. What's available, how to prepare, what schooling is needed, etc. The person I mentioned this to seemed to misunderstand and said, oh, yes, let's do a workshop on starting your own business! Entrepreneurship is wonderful, but that's not what I meant. So anyway, she then says, "Isn't it a shame that even janitors these days are expected to have a college degree?!"

Huh?

Surely this isn't the case. I know that many college-educated people can't find jobs these days and are taking jobs that don't actually require their degree. But custodial help needing a degree? :unsure:

So can we discuss this? I have friends who are interested because at least one of their dc seems not to be college-bound. I may have one, too -- too early to tell right now. What are the careers/trades that don't require a college degree? I thought of some; somebody correct me if I'm wrong on any of them. Also, what schooling is needed, does anyone know?

construction worker
plumber
electrician
tool and die maker
mechanic (cars, planes, etc.)
factory work/assembly line/plant work
police officer
prison warden
custodial worker
hairstylist/beautician

I know there are more. I'm talking jobs that pay a decent living wage, and if you like the job you want to keep it (not counting retail or food service). I also believe that any job is a good job if done with integrity and hard work -- I don't look down on anyone who does their job well, no matter what it is (think garbage collector or street sweeper).

My dh and I are very college/academic oriented, so I don't know enough about this. Give me your thoughts!

Rachel Jane
04-03-2012, 08:06 PM
Utility lineman, but you do have a few years of on the job training and schoolwork. They are trying to make it a degreed job.
Telephone lineman
Helicopter pilot
Fireman
Landscaper
Repair man (washers, dryers, dishwashers)
tree removal
tour guide for hikers/kayakers/people who fish
waiter in upscale restaurant

KimR
04-03-2012, 10:51 PM
The insurance industry...
I worked in the industry for several years before staying home with kids to school. No college degree required. Pay greatly depends on your area; but starting pay 8-9 years ago with only a 440 insurance license (obtained from most specialty schools or self study) was $40K. Commercial lines pays higher than personal lines typically.

One could be an account manager/underwriter, customer service rep etc. Or of course the actual insurance agent (salesman who gets all the commission too) Can specialize in certain types of insurance as well such as Workers Comp. Once you get your foot in the door possibilities are endless if the overall environment is appealing.

HTH a little

Colleen OH
04-03-2012, 11:05 PM
Ditto all that has been mentioned.

I live in a sort of sub-culture because 99% of the adults I know up close and personal have never been to college and a good number of them never even finished high school. They do the kinds of jobs mentioned above and, seriously, many of them have a net-worth that would shock a lot of people. :cool:

Chris-AL
04-03-2012, 11:14 PM
I think the policeman position might vary depending on the state. Here in AL you can go to police academy without a college degree. You have to be 21 to apply, and you must meet certain physical requirements. I looked it up a few years ago because my dyslexic son wants to be a canine police officer.

However, I just met a lady in my neighborhood who moved here from Boston, MA, and her husband is a retired canine police officer and he was required to have a degree to get into police academy. I didn't ask, but now I wonder if an associates degree met the requirements.

I can see my son getting an associates degree in criminal justice, but I won't be forcing him to get a Bachelor's degree in something he's not interested in, if it's not required...

Love this thread!

A/C repair man is another well paid non college degreed job.

Chris-AL
04-03-2012, 11:19 PM
Real estate agent.
Military service.
Car mechanic.
Photographer.

Lisa TN
04-04-2012, 01:25 AM
Auto detailing
Construction
Landscaping
Bus, truck, limo, or taxi driver

Cori
04-04-2012, 02:07 AM
My husband is a pipefitter, which is like a plumber only big pipes and no toilets. ;) There are many trades that have an apprenticeship program where you work, get paid for working, and go to school a couple of nights a week. Then after 4 years you pass your test and get your license. You can then go on to work for a contractor, union job or start your own business.

It's a great job! It works really well for our family and my husband only works half the year, basically. He works 4 days on and 4 days off.

Please let me know if you have additional questions.

Rachel Jane
04-04-2012, 06:26 AM
owning a taxi service
owning a sports supply store
renting houses
truck driver
videographer
meter reader
solar panel installer

Gail in NY
04-04-2012, 07:09 AM
Ditto all that has been mentioned.

I live in a sort of sub-culture because 99% of the adults I know up close and personal have never been to college and a good number of them never even finished high school. They do the kinds of jobs mentioned above and, seriously, many of them have a net-worth that would shock a lot of people. :cool:

:yes: Colleen and they are sweet, humble, unassuming MILLIONAIRES!

My ds have awesome incomes with no college degrees One ones 2 businesses - home construction http://cozyhomesak.com/aboutus.html
and an excavating business

My other ds owns his own cabinetry shop and does custom kitchens for ahem... very upscale clients.

My 3rd ds is an awesome auto mechanic who never NOT has work.

My ds at home is now doing roofing and I dare say at 16 yo his income will equal or surpass his fathers! He is aspiring to be a diesel mechanic to work on large agricultural equipment and has often commented lately he would like to apprentice/work under Colleens ds!
My dd is a direct entry midwife.

no college needed in this family! These dc were all born of a farm, taught to work and taght to love to learn and purse their interests. I guess it works for us.

PS. sorry if this sounded like a mommy brag, but due to peer pressure, I spent a few years worried my kids wouldnt amount to anything. Relatives kept saying they should go to college and "get a real education", or " enough of this - when are they going to quit this homeschool stuff?" Hmmm...now looking at the kids in those families WITH a college degree and they work at a car rental at the airport, or a store in the mall as a sales clerk. One with a biology degree just started his job this week - selling insurance.
God has been good to us.

Christi in OH
04-04-2012, 08:00 AM
My husband is an international freight forwarder. No degree.

Robin in Colorado
04-04-2012, 08:46 AM
Chef

EMT

CINDY LB OH
04-04-2012, 12:13 PM
What about all those kids who attend career centers, or vo-tech centers. Many of them go off to college still, but most of them don't. They go right into the work force.

culinary workers
dental assisting
business office workers
early childhood education
digital media/graphic arts
computer techs
mechanics
horticulture/landscaping

My dd17 is enrolled at the county career center, as a homeschooler. She graduates this year from their culinary program. Not all counties work this way. Our doesn't. She goes to the neighboring county. She will be going off to college, but she has skills that will get her a good paying job.

So don't forget to consider the things offered through county career centers in your area.

Jennifer in VA
04-06-2012, 04:16 PM
My ds at home is now doing roofing and I dare say at 16 yo his income will equal or surpass his fathers! He is aspiring to be a diesel mechanic to work on large agricultural equipment and has often commented lately he would like to apprentice/work under Colleens ds!

The company we used for new gutters on our house has been "in the business" for over 20 years and he is 36 or 37. He started in high school, as some of our county's school have trade school routes. He started roofing, while in high school and he and his brother started a company shortly after graduating.

Susan Seaman
04-06-2012, 09:19 PM
Sales

My bil is in HVAC sales. He makes more money than both of his brothers who have engineering degrees (and one also has an MBA). He makes a $200K+ annual salary.

However, his net worth is below both of his brothers because he spends money like crazy.

Most of the non-college degree folks I know that make a LOT of money are in sales of some kind.

I have a son with a "salesman personality." I hope he goes to college (right now he hopes to go to the mission field), but if he decides not to, this will be a good option for him.

KarenF
04-07-2012, 11:01 AM
The apartment industry: leasing, managing, maintence

In regards to this question, do you consider a tech college a college degree? I also think of tech colleges separate from a 4 year degree.

Rebe
04-07-2012, 01:54 PM
In regards to this question, do you consider a tech college a college degree? I also think of tech colleges separate from a 4 year degree.

I think of them differently, too.

Our conference has never had workshops on anything other than traditional 4-year college or community college with the intent of transferring to a 4-year college. I knew there were lots of good jobs out there that required different educational paths. This thread has lots of good info!

Dawn Gilmore
04-08-2012, 05:27 AM
Hmmm...now looking at the kids in those families WITH a college degree and they work at a car rental at the airport, or a store in the mall as a sales clerk. One with a biology degree just started his job this week - selling insurance.
God has been good to us.

I think one of the problems with traditional college degrees, is that many kids go off to college without a plan, settle on a major of something they are interested in, or are good at, but without any clue of what they are going to do for a job once they get out of school. One of my requirements for my kids, is that if they go to college (and expect us to help pay for it) they have to get a degree they can use out of college. Nursing or education come to mind.

Carol Ryan
04-14-2012, 07:54 AM
Home appraisers
Land surveyers
Insurance medical/dental claims industry
Pharmacy technician

Merrilee Morse
04-14-2012, 10:26 AM
Not to start anything political, but I have to disagree with construction work paying a living wage these days. At one time, yes. We used to live really well. But in the past 20 years, I have seen Darrell's wages cut in half, then cut in half again because others will work for practically nothing. He had to take an early retirement because we simply could not live on what he makes anymore.

Nancy Ann
04-16-2012, 06:22 PM
I think it's a great idea to explore this topic with homeschool students. Their is such an emphasis that going to college is the only thing to do after one graduates high school. It is unfortunate. Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs actually spends quite a bit of time trying to promote skilled labor jobs. Here is his website. It is really interesting to listen to him talk because he has such a respect for those in the skilled labor market. http://www.mikeroweworks.com/

I wonder if you could set up some videos of him speaking for the kids to watch.

Even if my children have the academic ability to go to college my husband and I plan to talk with them about all sorts of directions in life. I also think that we need to emphasize integrity in the job we do and giving respect for all types of work.

Colleen OH
04-16-2012, 07:29 PM
I think it's a great idea to explore this topic with homeschool students. Their is such an emphasis that going to college is the only thing to do after one graduates high school. It is unfortunate. Mike Rowe from Dirty Jobs actually spends quite a bit of time trying to promote skilled labor jobs. Here is his website. It is really interesting to listen to him talk because he has such a respect for those in the skilled labor market. http://www.mikeroweworks.com/

I wonder if you could set up some videos of him speaking for the kids to watch.

Even if my children have the academic ability to go to college my husband and I plan to talk with them about all sorts of directions in life. I also think that we need to emphasize integrity in the job we do and giving respect for all types of work.

What you said reminds me of something my dh does periodically. He asks different businesmen that he respects because of their success and integrity to come to our home to speak to our sons on various topics relating to success in life/business. We invite other young boys and men to come as well.

Carol Ryan
04-17-2012, 06:49 AM
Colleen, that is so cool! I am impressed! :cool:

Donna in MO
04-18-2012, 10:37 AM
I've been very encouraged by this thread and a couple others I've read here. My 16yo (a former FIAR student :D ) has really struggled with the whole subject of college and academics since she started high school. She's a very smart girl and can pull off the academic work with A's (or at least B's), but it totally stresses her out. She's still a FIAR girl at heart.... loves unit studies, hands-on activities, handicrafts, art, books.... and really doesn't want to have to go to college. It would be like putting her in a box and taking away all the things that she loves. :unsure: She's not opposed to getting further training in some area of specialty -- is currently thinking strongly about culinary school -- but doesn't see why she or anybody else should "have" to go to a traditional 4-year college. (Many people just assume that's the next step and don't ever think outside the box.)

She does realize, of course, that if she wanted to do something specific that REQUIRES a degree (such as nursing, which she considered for a long time), then college wouldn't be an option. But she also knows there are a lot of other options out there that are more fitting to her personality, and discussions like this are very reassuring. :)

Donna in MO
04-18-2012, 10:40 AM
Incidentally, I just read this article about the Duggars and how they make their money (going all the way back to the beginning of their marriage, long before the TV show). No college degrees there. ;)

http://shine.yahoo.com/financially-fit/duggars-support-nineteen-kids-live-debt-free-180400323.html

Jennifer Unsell
08-26-2012, 09:09 PM
Just wanted to say that dh works as a network administrator and he does not have a college degree. He simply has a love for computers and taught himself everything he needs to know. He started out with Apple computers for 7 years in their retail stores and worked his way up. He now works for a private company. We make a pretty good salary off of it too. Their is a world of opportunity in computers- some of which do not require college degrees.

My dad and my fil both spent their life working in the oil industry. Neither have college degrees. I know that at one point my fil was making over 100,000$ a year and that was in 1980. Dh's brothers and my brother all work on oil rigs in California and make really good money. None have college degrees.

Just wanted to add those options. ;)

WendyW
08-26-2012, 10:17 PM
Just wanted to say that dh works as a network administrator and he does not have a college degree. He simply has a love for computers and taught himself everything he needs to know. He started out with Apple computers for 7 years in their retail stores and worked his way up. He now works for a private company. We make a pretty good salary off of it too. Their is a world of opportunity in computers- some of which do not require college degrees.


I don't think you could now enter this field without a degree. My dh retired from the AF with many years of computer experience and a LOT of self-taught knowledge. At that time, 2000, he quickly got a very well-paying job. In '01 the job market in computers collapsed, he was laid off, and since that time he cannot even get an interview, much less a job in a computer-related field. If he had some really good personal contacts he might get a break, but all the ads require very specific skills and degrees, and with applications now being computer-screened, if you don't have that degree on your resume it never even gets to the human resources department.

LillianD
08-26-2012, 11:23 PM
That's exactly right WendyW. I know someone who is a self taught software genius and when he was laid off from his long time job at Dell a year ago, hasn't even been able to get interviews.

I find this thread very interesting!!! Not so much for my kids, but for MYSELF. I've always wondered what I'll do when they grow up and leave the nest, and I have zero interest in going back to school. I live in an area where everyone has a degree, most stay at home Moms I know have masters degrees, so we are encouraging college for our kids.

Gitel in nj
08-27-2012, 06:56 AM
I don't think you could now enter this field without a degree. My dh retired from the AF with many years of computer experience and a LOT of self-taught knowledge. At that time, 2000, he quickly got a very well-paying job. In '01 the job market in computers collapsed, he was laid off, and since that time he cannot even get an interview, much less a job in a computer-related field. If he had some really good personal contacts he might get a break, but all the ads require very specific skills and degrees, and with applications now being computer-screened, if you don't have that degree on your resume it never even gets to the human resources department.

:yes: I was thinking this as well when I read several of the other posts, for example Insurance sales. I would doubt any (ethical) Insurance company would hire someone without a degree--and preferably a degree in finance--to sell their products. Answer the phones? Sure--maybe. Even if some of the husbands on here have taken that route, now, with the internet and the amount of resumes that come in from qualified candidates with degrees, I am guessing this is not likely.

I also agree with Merrilee, the construction industry has taken a major hit..our income has dropped precipitously, and unlike Darrell, my husband is not in a union, he owns his own home remodeling business. The internet and stores like home depot, as well as the economy and an influx of workers from other counties willing to work for less, has made this a difficult business....

Cori
08-27-2012, 10:36 AM
I'm sure this goes without saying, but for pipefitting you need to know calculus, and for any good job there is a lot of memory work involved. Some people might be able to study/learn at home and on the job then go pass the test, or land the job, but many don't have those opportunities/ability so they need to take classes at a technical or trade school, etc.

Either way it is a commitment to learning -- a love of learning and a good work ethic is essential.

Melinda
08-27-2012, 11:24 AM
A private music teacher doesn't have to have a degree. I was reading a music blog, Music Matters (http://musicmattersblog.com/), and the author--a homeschool graduate!--details how she became a Nationally Certified Music Teacher through program coursework. She now owns a successful music studio, so she also has to have some business sense, too!

Kindermusik Educators don't have to have a degree. A good understanding of music and desire to learn about child development is helpful.

I've been teaching violin and piano lessons for almost 3 years now. My degree is in journalism. But I obviously missed my calling as I love teaching music! I've looked into getting my Masters, but for the work and the student loans I'd collect, it's not worth it...especially since I'd still be making the same amount of money that I make now as a private teacher. (This actually makes me chuckle as I was very recently recruited by a large (expensive :eek:) studio to join their faculty. All of their teachers have extensive resumes and Master and Doctorate degrees. Except me. I'm just the homeschool mom who loves music. And we are all paid the same regardless of background. :lol:)

Jennifer Unsell
08-27-2012, 02:00 PM
I don't think you could now enter this field without a degree.

I'm so sorry your dh has struggled to find work. :group: Maybe it depends on who you are applying too or where in the country you live? I don't know? I just know dh has always made a good living for us in computers without a degree. I know some computer science jobs do require degrees. Is that what your dh is applying for or is he applying for a network admin specifically? Bryan (my dh) has only been a network admin for 4 years now. He managed the retail stores for Apple Computers previously. Started out working the genius bar in the apple store and worked hard and moved his way up to manager. Was sent to several different states to open and run the stores there. We then transferred back down here to AL. He was running one of the local Apple stores and one of his regular clients approached him about his current job. They wanted his knowledge and experience in the company and didn't care that he didn't have a degree in computers.

For what it's worth- we do know a few other people that work in the computer industry without degrees. I really do think it depends on WHAT your doing in the industry though as I do know certain jobs do require it.

Christi in VA
08-27-2012, 05:01 PM
My dh does not have a degree and works in a utility type field. He started out at not too much above minimum wage and is now a supervisor for 12 men and makes a good salary. A class or two in electrical / business / computers would have been nice but he's never needed it or been asked to get it. They like him for his leadership, work ethic and professionalism ( and willingness to get up the poles alongside his guys even if he is in khakis) .

Btw, most of that leadership experience was from years served in the U.S. Army. ;)

Ami
08-27-2012, 07:56 PM
Dh has been in HVAC for 20 years (Master contractor, service tech, management). No degree and a better-than-decent income is very much attainable in this field.

Marcia
08-28-2012, 12:25 PM
Dh has been in HVAC for 20 years (Master contractor, service tech, management). No degree and a better-than-decent income is very much attainable in this field.

My dh is also a HVAC mechanic. He went through an adult school training (when he was 21). He then went on to get a job with a company that put him through a 5 year (plumbers and pipe fitters) apprenticeship program. Throughout his career he has taken several classes and trainings to get certified in several things. He now works for Kaiser Hospital in California as an engineer. He never went to a traditional college. :)

LillianD
08-28-2012, 09:35 PM
I just remembered, machinists don't always need college degrees. There is a shortage right now, and experienced machinists are often willing to train. The pay is really good to, my Dad is a machinist and makes a great living at it.

Jennifer in VA
08-29-2012, 12:10 PM
I'm so sorry your dh has struggled to find work. :group: Maybe it depends on who you are applying too or where in the country you live? I don't know? I just know dh has always made a good living for us in computers without a degree. I know some computer science jobs do require degrees. Is that what your dh is applying for or is he applying for a network admin specifically? Bryan (my dh) has only been a network admin for 4 years now. He managed the retail stores for Apple Computers previously. Started out working the genius bar in the apple store and worked hard and moved his way up to manager. Was sent to several different states to open and run the stores there. We then transferred back down here to AL. He was running one of the local Apple stores and one of his regular clients approached him about his current job. They wanted his knowledge and experience in the company and didn't care that he didn't have a degree in computers.

For what it's worth- we do know a few other people that work in the computer industry without degrees. I really do think it depends on WHAT your doing in the industry though as I do know certain jobs do require it.

I do think it depends upon who is doing the employing. Some "big" government type jobs want the degree/certifications for computer related positions. They may even require that sub-contractors have degrees, but it has been awhile since I've worked for the government.

Laura Lee
08-29-2012, 02:44 PM
My DH is a software consultant. Travels mostly throughout the southeast installing manufacuring software for different companies and then get them up and running on it, teaching them how to use it.

Before that he was an IT manager for 2 different small companies and before that (20 years ago) he worked at ITT Defense Division as a Electronics Engineer.

All of this without a degree.

Colleen OH
08-29-2012, 03:09 PM
My oldest ds put an ad in the paper looking to hire a mechanic for his business. I don't think they got many calls except one guy said he had spent his last years working at Walmart and had quit his last mechanic job because he was tired of turning wrenches. :lol: duh. ???

While certainly trade school would be practical education for a mechanic, ds doesn't care how they learned what they know so long as they know it. That and showing up in the morning and doing an honest job of it.

All that to say, people with valuable skills and good work ethic do mean something in this world to some employers even if they haven't pulled off a degree.

Leslie Nelsen
09-04-2012, 11:56 PM
Welder.

One of my friends told me that her dh was looking to hire for their company and had a hard time finding people. The pay was VERY good too!

This is a great thread - and a great idea for a workshop too Rebe! :thumb:

Donna in MO
09-05-2012, 07:48 AM
I do think it depends upon who is doing the employing. Some "big" government type jobs want the degree/certifications for computer related positions. They may even require that sub-contractors have degrees, but it has been awhile since I've worked for the government.

:yes: My dh works for the government and a degree is required for his position. If you have a Master's, you can bump into an even better pay grade. The thing is, it doesn't even matter that much what your degree is in. My dh's undergrad is a general Bible and leadership degree from a Bible college, and his Master's is in Human Resources. His close co-worker, hired into the same position at the same time, is a lawyer. But neither would've been hired without a degree of some sort.

At the last agency where my dh worked, a degree was required for that position as well (similar, yet different position), but ten years ago a degree was NOT required for that position. Things have definitely changed on that front. :unsure:

Now, my dh's not even in computers.... but my friend's dh is, and he's very good at what he does. He knows them inside and out, backwards and forwards. He seems to be stuck with his company, though (been there for many years), which is a large, nationwide insurance agency, because he can't get hired anywhere else without going back to school for that coveted piece of paper. He's been applying to other places, both government agencies and civilian, off and on for several years, but can't get hired. :eyes:

Speaking of computer training, some of you might have a son or daughter interested in this: http://itonramp.com/default.aspx

Sue in MN
09-06-2012, 06:33 PM
I recently suggested a workshop at our homeschool conference next year regarding how to prepare your non-academically-oriented, non-college-bound student for a good job. What's available, how to prepare, what schooling is needed, etc. The person I mentioned this to seemed to misunderstand and said, oh, yes, let's do a workshop on starting your own business! Entrepreneurship is wonderful, but that's not what I meant. So anyway, she then says, "Isn't it a shame that even janitors these days are expected to have a college degree?!"

Huh?

Surely this isn't the case. I know that many college-educated people can't find jobs these days and are taking jobs that don't actually require their degree. But custodial help needing a degree? :unsure:

So can we discuss this? I have friends who are interested because at least one of their dc seems not to be college-bound. I may have one, too -- too early to tell right now. What are the careers/trades that don't require a college degree? I thought of some; somebody correct me if I'm wrong on any of them. Also, what schooling is needed, does anyone know?

construction worker
plumber
electrician
tool and die maker
mechanic (cars, planes, etc.)
factory work/assembly line/plant work
police officer
prison warden
custodial worker
hairstylist/beautician

I know there are more. I'm talking jobs that pay a decent living wage, and if you like the job you want to keep it (not counting retail or food service). I also believe that any job is a good job if done with integrity and hard work -- I don't look down on anyone who does their job well, no matter what it is (think garbage collector or street sweeper).

My dh and I are very college/academic oriented, so I don't know enough about this. Give me your thoughts!


Where I live, almost all of these jobs require some technical college and most are at least two year programs.

Colleen OH
09-06-2012, 06:47 PM
Where I live, almost all of these jobs require some technical college and most are at least two year programs.

I guess it depends where you live. Our area has a strong Amish/Mennonite presence. The Amish finish school at 8th, the Mennonites typically at 10th. They are generally all industiously employed at something.

Donna in MO
09-08-2012, 12:56 PM
LOL, perfect! :roflol: Just saw this in the September 8th issue of WORLD magazine....

Political cartoon on page 17. Young man on the left says, "This fall I'm going to trade school to be a welder." Young man on the right is thinking to himself, "Loser."

There's a caption next to the man on the left (trade school applicant) that says "Starting salary upon graduation: $50,000."

Caption next to the man thinking the other guy's a loser says, "Starting salary upon graduation from a pricey, 4-year school with a liberal arts degree: $25,000. (If he's lucky.)"

;)

Jennifer Unsell
09-09-2012, 11:02 PM
Was talking to dh about this thread. This is what he has to say.

Many companies are after certifications. It doesn't surprise either of us that a government job would require a degree. Their are many companies outside of government however that are more interested in what your certified in, than the degree you carry. Whether Apple or Microsoft Cisco certifications.

If you have a child that is interested in computers and a job in the industry but doesn't desire to go to college for a full degree, the best thing you can do is buy a computer and start learning. Their are different classes that one can take online for certifications. When dh worked for Apple they paid for him to take the classes and become certified. He averages 1-2 phone calls a month from recruiters. The latest phone call was from Blue Cross/Blue Shield. The first thing that the recruiters want to know is whether the certifications listed on his resume online are up to date. Most never ask about degree. It's those certifications that tell the company you know what you know. Dh is skilled in Windows and Macs which makes him even more valuable. Companies are always impressed with his hands on experience with both platforms. Becoming skilled in both can increase your child's chances of interest from recruiters because many companies are just now bringing macs into their companies.

Computers is a very skilled job- much like an artist. Anyone can take an art class but not everyone can be an artist. Anyone can take a class at a college but it doesn't mean they know the stuff. Certifications is a different story though. It tells exactly what you do know.

One of the guys at dh's current company has a degree but not in computers and is currently taking a computer class at a college. He finds it funny that the book stuff is not up to date in the class and the way he is actually learning the program is just to mess around with it.

Cindy in CA
09-10-2012, 02:13 PM
LOL, perfect! :roflol: Just saw this in the September 8th issue of WORLD magazine....

Political cartoon on page 17. Young man on the left says, "This fall I'm going to trade school to be a welder." Young man on the right is thinking to himself, "Loser."

There's a caption next to the man on the left (trade school applicant) that says "Starting salary upon graduation: $50,000."

Caption next to the man thinking the other guy's a loser says, "Starting salary upon graduation from a pricey, 4-year school with a liberal arts degree: $25,000. (If he's lucky.)"

;)
Not to mention all the debt that he probably has paying for that 4 year degree. LOL!

:)

Donna in MO
09-10-2012, 06:34 PM
Not to mention all the debt that he probably has paying for that 4 year degree. LOL!

:)

Seriously! :eek: