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Cori
04-17-2012, 09:31 PM
My 8.5 yo seems to have some memory issues. He cannot remember phone numbers very well, which I can understand since he doesn't use them every day, but he forgets his birthday!! We worked on it because he got a library card 6 months ago and didn't know how to spell his name (out loud) and did not know his birthday (I was embarrassed). So we started working on it every day for a couple of months. Then enough review in the last few months to remember. It's been a month or so since I asked him and today he said 2002 (it's 2003) but then he said the right year. He could not remember the month and day. We asked him if he's pulling our leg, which he does. Then our 5 yo said, come on! You know it. Which should have spurred him on, with competition. He never got upset, and was clearly stumped. So I said, I'll go through the months and you tell me which one it is... I got to March and he said, "March!" It's September.

I'm just so....baffled and concerned. He doesn't have trouble remember things that are important to him but WHY is his birth date not that important? He's also forgetting math that we did the month before. He's not memorizing math facts, but does fine with counting and skip counting and math concepts. He's VSL, I think.

I've worried about dyslexia with him before. He makes slow progress and some leaps, and he also pulls my leg to get out of reading, so it makes it hard to tell.

Gosh I want to cry thinking he might not be able to remember important stuff.

Should I spend the money to have him tested? I think it is several hundred dollars by the time it's all done. :sad:

He has to do the standarized test next year 2 or 3 times (charter school), btw, and I think he might need some accommodations. I don't know how to help him, since I get frustrated thinking he's just being difficult.

:sad:

He's not a difficult child anymore, btw, just when it comes to reading and writing and rote memory. He's a really good boy, likes to please with helping around the house, and doesn't seem to have other behavior issues unless he drinks/eats too much chocolate then he gets wound up.

WendyW
04-17-2012, 09:43 PM
I don't have any answers, but I sure can sympathize! My ds2 is the same way. He's 12, and can't name all the months. We have learned them EVERY year, and if asked at some random time, he can't name them. He has a HORRID time trying to pull names of items or people out of his head. As a preschooler, it took him 3 years to learn his best friend's name. At age 6, he could not tell you how old he was unless he counted up to 6. He KNEW his age, he just could not get the word "six" out of his brain without counting up to it.

Oh, how I WISH I had answers!

normafl
04-18-2012, 10:19 AM
Cori, one of my daughters is the same way thou she has been diagnosed with sequential issues and dyslexia.
So one thing that I do is make visual/picture associations with her. So for example:
Have him draw a picture that reminds him of something that happens in September (not his birthday) if nothing comes to mind then its the month before Halloween.
Draw his birthday number in the picture somewhere. Example :frame the whole thing with this number, Incorporate (day of birth) in a tree branch or in a pocket or inside a pumpkin or in the how many pumkins sitting on a fence......

Then the year of his birthday floating in a cloud. Or you could make this number for example the price of a pumpkins ...$20.03 cents

Talk about the picture often! " Great Picture you did" I love it" Let him own it. He's creation, so it becomes important to him. Hang it on the fridge ,over his desk wherever he is going to see it.
After he can recall what month is referred in the picture and where that number is and where/what the 4 digit(2003) number is then tell him its his birthday.
So then next time you ask him whats your birthday he has something to pull from his brain bank. So he says "I dont remember...." you say "tell me about that picture..." eventually he will not need the picture.

For my daughter its not that her birthday wasnt important its just that there are so many months and things hapenning in those months that are just as exciting ya know what I mean...

Reading might be hard if he has dyslexia and therefore he tries to get out of it.

I did have my daughter tested and it was expensive and she does has a no timed thing on her affidavit but if you cant have him tested then dont worry about it for now. He is still pretty young. Just treat him AS IF he has a learning issue. See if that helps him and go from there.

Hope this helps :)

Cori
04-18-2012, 01:26 PM
Thank you Norma and Wendy. That is a really good idea to draw the picture. I will talk to my husband about testing. He doesn't think he needs testing, but I do. I will teach him as if he does have an LD, I can be more creative in my approach. I need to find some books that give me more ideas like this. He learns so differently than me. And everything I read doesn't have specific ideas like this.

Thank you.

normafl
04-18-2012, 01:56 PM
Cori, its been a long road for me. My daughter will be fifteen in a couple of months so I have been at it for a while :). Would love to know if this works for him.

As far as math, maybe teaching him how to get to the answer would be a more helpful approach.
I was able to use Touch Math as a visual aid for her. (the library had it) It really helped her SEE what each number represented. Let him use his fingers its ok.
And the other helpful thing was to not crowd the paper. So it will seem like a waste of paper to have just two or four problems on the sheet but when you have trouble remembering the sequences of things, too many things on a sheet is so very confusing. So what I did was draw a line down the center of the paper so she had a big box just for that problem.
I found that for my daughter writing the numbers in color was also very helpful. I did it for telling time etc,,,
And one more thing, writing and thinking are sometimes hard to do at the same time if you have issues. So if she was learning a new concept such as subtraction with borrowing. I would talk her thru the problem and ask her for answers but I would write it for her. That helped manage the stress of learning something new AND having to write it down correctly KWIM?

Anyway Im rambling but I was trying to think of what I did at her age that worked.

HTH's :)

Cori
04-18-2012, 02:57 PM
It makes a lot of sense, thank you. I've been writing the math answers for him sometimes, especially when learning something new. And I've noticed the same things with learning something new, when information flies out of his brain. He does math with manipulatives or in his head, but doesn't remember math facts. He is skip counting pretty well. He used an abacus to learn to skip count, so maybe that is why he can remember.

For the things he remembers well, I'll have to pay attention to what he was doing at the time he learned it. I'll bet it will have some hands-on connection like that. Thanks for pointing it out.

I think knowing he has an LD, will help me have more patience. I have to watch this one because he will pull my leg too, to get out of doing it. Double challenge. Sometimes I will say, OK we need to work on this a lot and he will spit out the answer. Maybe if he knows it will just cause more work, he'll stop pulling my leg.

WendyW
04-18-2012, 02:59 PM
Cori, one of my daughters is the same way thou she has been diagnosed with sequential issues and dyslexia.


Norma, what kind of testing gave you these result, where did you get it, and what did it cost?

My older son had testing at the public school in around 3rd grade, and while they confirmed what I had perceived, there was NO specific diagnosis, and the "solutions" they offered me were a canned package that in no way addressed his specific issues.

Did the techniques you tried with your daughter actually "fix" her issues and make it easier for her to learn, or does she still require such specific intervention on each thing that gives her trouble? One reason I have not tried things like the picture cards is that I envision an entire lifetime doing extra intervention to learn this item, and then the next, then the next, ad infinitum! THAT is such a daunting prospect. To me it seems much more useful to give him the resources to find the answers when he needs them. For example, he's working his way through the Calculadders for math facts, but he has a times table at hand to do his math assignments. I figure someday he'll get them learned, but I'm not going to spend years on learning them at the expense of all the other math stuff.

Cori
04-18-2012, 05:52 PM
I envision an entire lifetime doing extra intervention to learn this item, and then the next, then the next, ad infinitum! THAT is such a daunting prospect. To me it seems much more useful to give him the resources to find the answers when he needs them. For example, he's working his way through the Calculadders for math facts, but he has a times table at hand to do his math assignments. I figure someday he'll get them learned, but I'm not going to spend years on learning them at the expense of all the other math stuff.

I feel rather overwhelmed too, honestly. I heard that for someone to get accommodations in college then they have to have been tested with in the last 2 years, so you might wait until it is closer for him before spending the money.

I think the use calculators in PS too. I want him to know how to solve the problem and where to find the info he needs too. That is more important than being a human calculator, for sure. In Life of Fred, it says something like you memorize it to save time. But if memorizing takes all the time...

I keep thinking about my Dad. He struggled with reading and writing all his life (no dx), but he was mechanically brilliant -- very innovative and could fix anything. My son is like him. I guess I shouldn't sweat the multiplication charts, etc., and just help him remember the most important numbers. We'll see about spelling.... we are just trying to get reading established first but he will spell random words because he wants to know.

It's funny because he doesn't have memory issues with other things. I think it something about sequential numbers/letters.

ETA: He can read a calendar and read the month names, so maybe I don't need to worry about that... He does need to learn his phone number, address, birthdate, and eventually his SSN.

normafl
04-18-2012, 06:05 PM
Cori, Im glad it was helpful. Yes keep an eye on his jokes lol,,,My daughter stopped fighting me as much when she realized that I was willing to listen to her and accomodate her thou I know this isnt the case for you. Geez I wish she had been a little jokey lol...

Wendy we had her tested a while back I think she was around 9 or 10 she is almost 15. We went to a private center that specialized in these kind of tests. It was a weeks worth of testing everyday for about 3 hours. I guess it was a combo psychological/academic kind of thing. It was quite expensive if I remember correctly around $2,400.00?.

We did have her testing thru the school system first and they said their was nothing wrong with her or if there was it was minor so they would not offer any services. They said that they would only offer services that pertained to her complying/functioning/behaving in the classroom. so for example they offered speech therapy because he/she needs to answer in class. But my daughter doesnt need speech therapy! I believe things have gotten better since then thou.

The testing center offered some advice of which i didnt listen to because they disaproved of homeschoolers but really all I wanted was a confirmation of what I was experiencing at home. Once she was diagnosed with particular labels then I was able to go hunting and reading up on things to help her.

For example they said she would never be able to spell or learn her timetables so I should buy her a voice activated speller and hand her a calculator. And while I know this is true for some kids I KNEW that I could get her to spell.Their best recommendation was to put her in school in the care of experts lol....Yea right!!

I dont think there is fixing neurologiccal issues. At least not for us. So my approach has been to access her right brain, creative side. She is definitly a picture/sound girl. So I have tackled each subject with that in mind. Over the years she herself has been able to recognize how to organize something in a way that she can learn it. This has been my goal all along!
So to answer your question I did spend a lot of time at certain momments and with each subject making it work for her as much as I can. So for example I would drop some subjects for the time being because timetables are important to learn ( i used Timetales).

She couldnt spell either but we put that on hold. So for a while she would just dictate to me her answers and when she got older she would tape her co-op classes and bring them home. We eventually got around to spelling and now she writes pretty good. She will be taking a writing class this coming year.
Reading was hard (thats another post lol) but once we started I pretty muched dropped everything til she got it. Except for FIAR which she has always loved so i would save it til the end lol...

So I guess there is no short answer. Each year I decide what is important and what can go on the backburner. It has helped her a ton to see how to work with what she has. She is a much more independent learner thou i am always around to help. So she does math by herself BUT I found a video instructional so I dont have to sit with her but because she has learned her time tables life is so much easier. Sometime I do sit with her and discuss the lesson because she does well when the subject is discussed. She is somewhat auditory . So she can work on her own but Im around.:lol:

When we moved I decided to back her up a year so instead of entering highschool I let her repeat 8 grade and she was fine with it as no one knew her in NC. That also has given her a chance to catch up a bit !! Or you can do a super senior thing but ours worked out great this way.

Hope this helps and makes sence as I need to go out tonight and but wanted to answer before I forget which I am prone to do!:lol:

CINDY LB OH
04-18-2012, 07:19 PM
This also describes my ds13. We've never had him formally tested, but all my research has led me to believe he has auditory processing issues and dyslexia, along with confirmed Aspergers.

Dianne Craft (http://www.diannecraft.org/) has been a wealth of information for us. We use her Right Brain Phonics, and her Brain Integration Therapy, and other Right Brain teaching methods like Norma suggests. They work, but it's a tough road. He still often forgets how to spell his last name as anything related to reading and writing is a huge struggle. Math is easier but he still struggles with remembering facts and processes.

We also use Audiblox. A program for dyslexia, dysgraphia, processing issues, and memory issues. We see improvement each year, but this year he has made a pretty good leap.

Here's a link to articles by Dianne Craft (http://www.diannecraft.org/articles.htm). We also sat in on all her workshops at our homeschool convention a few years ago. Very helpful. She is a wonderful lady and so willing to answer questions. None of her programs were a quick fix for us however. Though she says your child will improve in reading by 2 grade levels, ds13 is only at an upper 1st grade reading level. His progress is slow but constant. Some days are good, other days are a struggle especially when learning something totally new.

This article (http://www.diannecraft.org/article-010.htm) is specific to auditory processing and memory, and it is in regard to using dietary supplements. We haven't tried the Lecithin yet. I'm not sure why :unsure: but I'm going to start ds13 and my dh on it. Dh really needs a memory boost :lol:

She has lots of other articles as well, and has lesson plans for reading (http://www.diannecraft.org/tutor2.htm) and math. You do not have to buy her reading program/book. It's just lists of words. She has her whole process written out here, and you can make your own lists.

She also has an article on right-brain math. (http://www.diannecraft.org/article-007.htm)

Just some more ideas for you.

Lindsey Carter
04-18-2012, 10:50 PM
Dyslexia often involves a lot of sequencing issues. Also, you don't have to reverse letters to be dyslexic. My ds9 hasn't been formally diagnosed with dyslexia (because we live in Japan it would be very difficult to do) but seems to be the poster child for dyslexia symptoms. There are many more than I originally realized. He also seems to be dysgraphic. I suspect my dd may be dyslexic as well, although not as severely as my eldest. I wold try looking up the symptoms for dyslexia and dyscalcula and then you might get a feel for weather or not it is a possibility. Having an idea of what is going on has helped me to change the way I teach in order to help my dc best learn. I found a great reading program called Verticy. It is designed for homeschooling dyslexics. I don't recommend their core program but the phonics/spelling and grammar/composition have been great so far! I know how frustrating it is to teach an ld kid! Praying that you find the best answers for how to teach your dc. :group:

ShelleyW
04-19-2012, 04:14 PM
My 8 yo ds was recently diagnosed with dyslexia and he is very similar to your son. He still does not know the days of the week. He does remember the month and date of his bday but not the year. He has no clue about the months. He still can't spell his middle name of all of his sisters' names even though we have worked and worked and worked on them. Dianne Craft was so helpful to us. I contacted her through HSLDA and she really helped steer me in the right direction.

To improve his memory, we have been working through Earobics which has helped. HearBuilders also has a program that works on memory. I do recommend testing if you can afford it b/c there could be more going on there. My ds was also referred to a ST to test his hearing and a possible diagnosis of Auditory Processing Disorder which fits him. We haven't had our evaluation done yet. Our testing was covered by our insurance 100%. I was pretty sure my ds was dyslexic but would not have know about the APD. It has really changed how we work together now b/c sometimes I too thought he was messing around when in fact he really couldn't do it.

If you really do suspect dyslexia, you want to be sure to find and Orton Gillingham based reading program. There are quite a few to choose from but it has made all the difference in the world for my dyslexic kids.

Cori
04-19-2012, 06:17 PM
Thank you all. I do have All About Spelling and Reading Reflex. I'll check out your recommendations. I think we must do the testing because I really need to know if I need to do this extra research. I feel like I'm asking these questions over the years, then something will improve, and I think I was imagining it. Then we are back to square one almost. Or 2 steps forward and 1 step back.

I keep coming back to this with him and I need answers. Thanks for all your suggestions. I'll bookmark them for when we figure out what is going.

Shannon P
04-20-2012, 01:42 AM
My oldest has some sequencing issues. It's insidious because they have no sense of that which is supremely sequential: time. DS is very fluid, and had a hard time following sequential instructions or doing a math sheet without skipping problems because he did them in random order.

I did calendar every day with him until he was a teen. I had a month calendar printed up and put on the fridge. He would put a month-themed sticker on each day. The sticker was much more interesting than just crossing off the day. I had magnets that labeled today, yesterday, and tomorrow. We advanced them along every day. Under the name of the month I wrote "this month". At the top and bottom, I listed the previous and next month by name, with the labels last month and next month. I added magnets on the side that pointed to this week, last week, and next week. I would write important events such as birthdays on the calendar so he could see them in relation to the magnets. I think I got the idea from various educational calendar products where the month, day, year and even season are chosen and displayed, but my ds needed to see the progression of time, including past, present and future, on a month calendar. We continued using the calendars as a family planner after we discontinued daily calendar time.

We didn't do seasons because we have only 2 seasons here in Phoenix: summer and snowbird.:lol:

Dawn Gilmore
04-20-2012, 03:04 AM
You might look here: www.susanbarton.com she has a wealth of information available about dyslexia, and warning signs to watch out for.

I have two sons who struggle. The oldest, I've never tested specifically for dyslexia, because he eventually learned to read. However I did have him tested at a company called learning Rx nearly 2 years ago. They identified several learning issues specifically related to memory. They have a cognitive skills training program that may have helped him, but it was far more costly than we could possibly have afforded. :( He also understands math concepts, but has always struggled with memorization of math facts. At least until he got into algebra... he really didn't get that at all.

Now that he's 18, I took him for vocational testing through a State program. Just had him tested last week. The girl who administered the program said that the results she was seeing were very consistent with the results we'd received from the other company (dh always felt that those results were suspect, because they had a product to sell),

Younger ds we had tested last year through the public schools, and they found nothing (don't waste your time there). After they said "yeah, he's behind, but it's not a problem" :eyes: we went to the pediatrician. He referred us to a Developmental Pediatrician who did further testing, and they identified a "visual processing disorder." (apparently dyslexia can be something of a catch all term for a lot of learning difficulties)

This child was reading at a 2nd grade level, but going into 6th grade. I had HUGE disagreement with the PS assessment of "it's not a problem." We started him working on an Orton-Gillingham based reading program, and he's made GREAT strides. The one I've linked above is designed to be accessible to parents... it doesn't require lots of training to be the teacher. I talked about it with a friend of mine, who has children who have also struggled, and she's currently using it with much success. It's kind of expensive, but you don't have to buy it all at once. It runs about $300/level, and you can buy a level at a time... the total cost is around $3000. Even then, it's cheaper than wasting YEARS struggling and teaching your child to hate reading/learning/school because it's not something they can succeed at with normal methods.

normafl
04-20-2012, 08:11 AM
ok so Ill pop in one more time lol ..I wanted to say that over the years I have discovered that not all dyslexics/LD's are the same. What that means is that even thou a product says its for ld it doesnt necesarily mean it will work. It might, but if it doesnt dont be discouraged just try something else. Ebay has been my friend! :lol:

I tried many of the products the girls are talking about and they did nothing lol.. So in the end in 5 grade still not reading and having heard ALL the phonics rules a million times in frustration I told her to pick out her favorite book (it was a five in arow btw :) and we started by me reading then she with her finger following along the bottom she would read the same sentence. If she got stuck on a word I would remind her of some rules quickly then tell her the word she would go over the paragraphs a few times and move on. We did the whole book like this and she was able to read the whole thing to the end. This did the trick for her. She needed so SEE how reading worked not more rules exactly. This was towards the end of fifth grade by the end of the school year she was reading 3 grade level from kindergarten. By the end of summer when I had her tested she was reading at 7 grade level. crazy right?

Like Shannon, I really worked on the calendar lol...

For the months of the year I printed them in colorful paper then I arranged them started at the top with Jan all the way to Dec in order so that she could see the correct order then I made an arrow that she could tape pointing at the current month. So all the months were in correct sequence but she could point what month we were in.

I did the same for the seasons except I used a picture instead of an arrow.

I also bought her ( her choice) her own calender over her desk. The first thing she had to do before school was check off the previous day. She recieved a prize for keeping up with her calender Nothing big a pack of gum something from the dollar store. It took her a long time to get it and to remember them but with all the passing holidays birthday any activites we would refer to their calender and eventually she did get it.

BTW, she could never remember how many days in each month no matter how many times we sang the song lol... So I gave up and just had her use her knuckles to figure it out. So after so many "show me how many days in .... she can now tell me how many days in each month

It is a LOT of work to homeschool a LD child. Couldnt tell you the years of frustration and anger and "Im running away from home, Im done" and that was me, not my child lol.....

She still needs me but not nearly as much as when she was a child. She is a much more independent learner. When this child was younger I envisioned her living in my basement for the rest of her life lol... She is almost 15 and I can see that she is going to be ok. She can figure out how to do something so it works for her. Some things take her a while but she does get there. And really thats all I need. That she will be able to figure life out on her own and make it work So just hang in there it will get better!

This summer she will be taking her driving class. I am helping her study the booklet. This blows my mind!!:eek: Of course she will NOT be drving by herself for a good LONG..... time lol.. But still! She's come a long way!!

oh and this is the spelling program which worked for us http://www.dyslexiavictoriaonline.com/ it is very much a picture-word-right brain association kind of program.

We tried All About Spelling for her and it did nothing BUT it was worked beautiful with my other dyslexic child. Because my younger daughter is much more kinestetic.

I am so thankful for you all. Its sometimes a lonely road to travel homeschooling an LD child while your friends are talking about their kids accomplishments. So thank you!

Editing to say here is a youtube video showing you how to count the days for the months using your knuckles http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6Ma0D-fN38

Have a great day!!

CINDY LB OH
04-20-2012, 08:18 AM
I use Reading Reflex and it's Orton-Gillingham. Very good program. It's been a combination of many things for us though, not just one program since ds has other issues going on.

We also use Sequential Spelling, developed specifically for children with dyslexia, and it has been very good. We just started it this year and it has also helped with his reading and processing. I use Scrabble tiles with him so there is a hands-on element, and he's really starting to "see" the patterns now which has carried over into his reading. Dianne Crafts sight word/spelling method works extremely well for those words that have no pattern or rule.

CINDY LB OH
04-20-2012, 08:26 AM
Thanks for that link Norma. And on sale too! At that price, it is something extra I can afford and hopefully get some new ideas to add to our arsenal.

Which book were you referring to?

normafl
04-20-2012, 08:54 AM
I bought the school program which is all the them in one but if I had to choose then I would buy the How to spell one.

Yes we do need an arsenal dont we lol....

Leslie Nelsen
04-20-2012, 11:50 PM
Hi Cori,

I also have a child that struggles with some similar issues. He has been tested and we were told "reading disability" and "writing disability". Helpful, huh? We also took him to an audiologist for testing (at the ear doctor's office). This testing indicated Auditory Processing Disorder. (Just sharing about the testing in case you or someone else is looking for a place to start.)

Have you read any books on "right brain learners"? Right Brain Learner in a Left Brain World is one that I found helpful. I'm also on a RB yahoo loop that discusses a wide variety of learning issues/solutions if you want a link to that.

:group:

Its hard figuring it all out, isn't it? :group: I'm nowhere near getting it figured out either. Its a process. I'm glad too for others who understand.

Cori
04-21-2012, 12:18 AM
Wow, so many great ideas, thank you!!!

I have read quite a bit about VSL and I'm convinced he is this type of learner. My husband said tonight that he doesn't need testing, but I'm the one who does the teaching.

I do have Reading Reflex!! And working on phoneme segmentation has helped a lot. He was not hearing all the sounds in words and we are working on it. I'm not sure about some of the words, so I wish I had training in it. Decoding words on paper, is harder for him than doing it verbally.

I will try different things. I was reading Susan Barton site this morning and he has most of the symptoms listed there, but other sites the symptoms don't match up so well. I'm hearing from another Mom who said dyslexia wasn't found in her daughter until she started reading Harry Potter, I think it was.

We do have a Melissa and Doug Calendar and I could make the magnets as you suggested. That's great. And thanks for the video on knuckle counting. I think if he has tricks like that, he'll do much better. It's just remembering them all.

In February, I did feel like running away from home. I can relate!

So helpful, thank you.

:)

Amy Joy
04-21-2012, 12:37 AM
Have you read any books on "right brain learners"? Right Brain Learner in a Left Brain World is one that I found helpful. I'm also on a RB yahoo loop that discusses a wide variety of learning issues/solutions if you want a link to that.

:group:

Its hard figuring it all out, isn't it? :group: I'm nowhere near getting it figured out either. Its a process. I'm glad too for others who understand.

This book I amazing. I was old my dd has a long processing time and while she wasn't far enough on an spectrums to actually have a LD, she leans strongly that way in several areas. She def. tested as being right brained tho and this book helped so much in understanding better ways to teach her. In fact I think I'm going to dig it out and reread it.

Cori
04-21-2012, 01:01 AM
This book I amazing. I was old my dd has a long processing time and while she wasn't far enough on an spectrums to actually have a LD, she leans strongly that way in several areas. She def. tested as being right brained tho and this book helped so much in understanding better ways to teach her. In fact I think I'm going to dig it out and reread it.

OK, thanks, I'll see if I can get it.

Cori
04-21-2012, 10:58 AM
I ordered a few books from Amazon last night. Right Brained Child..., The Gift of Dyslexia and The Dyslexia Advantage.

And I found a tester in Oregon. She is going to have workshops at the homeschool convention this summer, so I'll go to the workshops before having her test him. My gut says he has it. How much it will affect him, I don't know. I'm reading that it presents slightly differently in each individual, and I can see we've all experienced that too.

I am bookmarking this thread and the suggestions in it, so hopefully I can find this info in 6 months! I'm feeling less overwhelmed now.

Thanks again. :kiss:

Jill in Monrovia
04-21-2012, 04:38 PM
Weird question but... Can he reach from say the right arm across his left side to grab something? Or the reverse? Or does he grab things with one hand and give it to the other hand?

Can he do two (or three) digit addition and subtraction?

If he can't do those, look into a "crossing midline" problem.

Jill in Monrovia

Cori
04-22-2012, 12:56 AM
Jill, he can do all those things. 2 and 3 digit add/sub would be more with whole tens and hundreds but he can do both in his head, and he can do it on paper with any 2 or 3 digit numbers.

Jennifer in VA
04-22-2012, 07:19 AM
Lots of questions and lots of responses that I want to go back and reread.

Cori - In one of your responses you've described my 12 year old to a "t" when he was 8. I SO VERY Wish we'd gotten the ball rolling with testing and such for him then. I seriously thought that just bringing him home would have been enough. Four and half years later, there are areas he is still stuck at a first or second grade level.

To those who posted about cost, we are meeting with a second pyschologist because the first just made me angry. Believe it would have been in the thousands, if we had stayed with Children's Hospital. Not so sure with the private practice, but think it is about $500.

Jennifer in VA
04-22-2012, 07:39 AM
We also use Audiblox. A program for dyslexia, dysgraphia, processing issues, and memory issues. We see improvement each year, but this year he has made a pretty good leap.

Cindy - looked at Audioblox and it seems interesting. Got a bit confused though, do you work on one aspect, like dyslexia first then move onto the next weakest area? Our oldest has A LOT of the issues they mentioned.

CINDY LB OH
04-22-2012, 08:19 AM
Cindy - looked at Audioblox and it seems interesting. Got a bit confused though, do you work on one aspect, like dyslexia first then move onto the next weakest area? Our oldest has A LOT of the issues they mentioned.
Jennifer-- It is a little confusing because it gives you options, so you have to figure out for yourself which one to start with and they really don't make that clear. We started with the dyslexia track, then went to the reversal track, then back to the dyslexia track. I haven't tried the dysgraphia track yet, though it just has a few different exercises. I'm thinking to start it this summer.

Jennifer in VA
04-22-2012, 10:20 AM
Jennifer-- It is a little confusing because it gives you options, so you have to figure out for yourself which one to start with and they really don't make that clear. We started with the dyslexia track, then went to the reversal track, then back to the dyslexia track. I haven't tried the dysgraphia track yet, though it just has a few different exercises. I'm thinking to start it this summer.

If you buy the kit, do you get all the sets? There are several of them that 12yo would benefit from.

Amy Joy
04-22-2012, 11:24 AM
I got audioblox for my dd when she was 8 thru our homeschool school and it helped her quite a bit.

Gwen in Texas
04-22-2012, 12:22 PM
Hey, Cori. My son is a struggling learner as well. He just turned 15. I could write volumes, and would be happy to share more, but I'll address just the testing and memory. When Nate turned 9 and still wasn't reading, I knew we had to get help. I started with a behavioral optometrist. She did recommend Nate for vision therapy, but I was concerned there was more to it than retraining eyes.

So I took him to a neurodevelopmentalist. He was assessed and I was given hours of exercises/activities to do with him daily. We slogged through that for a couple of years until Nate quit on me. I do feel like it was a good program that gave Nate some things he was missing and was part of the puzzle, but it was hard and time-consuming. And no matter how good the program, if your child won't do it anymore you won't get results!

I was at a loss of where to turn next. I had heard good things about a program an old friend was running, but didn't know what educational therapy was or if it would help Nate. My husband and I met with the program director and diagnostician and felt it would be a good fit. Nate was tested, which took about a week of sessions. I'm sure costs vary, but ours was about $800. Happily, they allowed us to make payments! After we went over the results, Nate began going twice weekly for 80 min. educational therapy sessions.

I cannot say enough good about this approach for my son! The underlying principle is that the brain is "plastic" and changeable. We are not stuck with what we have now. We can retrain our brains to work better. Thinking clearly has made a huge difference for Nate in all areas of his life, not just academically. So worth the time, effort and money. You can read more about it and search for a therapist in your area here. (http://nild.org/parents.asp)

Cori
04-22-2012, 01:02 PM
Thanks, Gwen, I will look into that also.

If you all don't mind, I'm going to write a blog post and include all these links and maybe some short quote suggestions so I remember them a few months or a year from now as I go through and try different things. Nothing personal, btw.

I don't know how often FIAR boards clear, but I want to make sure I have this info and suggestions so I don't have to ask again. It will be a check list of sorts, try this, and this and this. :)

Everyone has different things that helped and I'm happy to have different things to try, keywords to research, etc. We just need to keep plugging away at it until he gets where he wants to go.

I'm also going to try to establish daily reading habits in both my boys. Where they look at / read books quietly every day. They've always been so active I didn't try this before. I think we use it or lose it, so daily reading will be important. When they are older, the newspaper or news articles would suffice to keep up with skills. I hope they both love to read books one day, but I can see my eldest preferring audio books all his life. He does love audio books.

So...if you don't want to be quoted, please let me know and I'll make my post private. I'll use first names only.

On second thought, I might make it private anyway. I'm feeling overwhelmed and not ready to share....

Thanks again!!

normafl
04-22-2012, 01:03 PM
Gwen I am interested in a educational specialist. I think I would love some support this coming year. So I guess what I want to know is do they tutor them on certain subjects or do they do brain exercises? Or maybe a combo of both? I saved the link and I will call on Monday. There are several in my area some private practice and some associated with private schools.

Thanks, Norma

*my child is entering highschool and I think some outside influence would come in handy just about now:)

Gwen in Texas
04-22-2012, 03:26 PM
Norma, the techniques used for educational therapy cross over into different academic areas as well. The point is to think clearly and precisely, but they get there through mediated math and language activities, in addition to other things. I'm sure every therapist is different, but ours is very open to incorporating school elements into therapy, if it "fits" with her goals for Nate. Does that help?

Gwen in Texas
04-22-2012, 03:27 PM
*my child is entering highschool and I think some outside influence would come in handy just about now:)

Outside support is an invaluable resource for secondary, imho.

CINDY LB OH
04-22-2012, 05:19 PM
If you buy the kit, do you get all the sets? There are several of them that 12yo would benefit from.
Yes, all the different program tracks are in the kit/manual.

normafl
04-22-2012, 05:52 PM
Gwen thanks for the clarification. Thou I understand her LD's pretty good I think outside intervention would be so awesome at this point. She is asking for more independance and she is getting it but maybe meeting with some else who is trained and not her mom ;) would fit the bill at this time.

I am aiming to give one of them on the list a call on Monday or Tuesday depending on how busy life gets lol....

Love this thread!!!:clap:

normafl
04-22-2012, 05:55 PM
Cori thats a great idea I forget stuff all the time that I save. Do you have a public blog? Would love to check it out if its not private.

Thanks for starting this thread!!:)

ShelleyW
04-23-2012, 09:23 PM
Hey, Cori. My son is a struggling learner as well. He just turned 15. I could write volumes, and would be happy to share more, but I'll address just the testing and memory. When Nate turned 9 and still wasn't reading, I knew we had to get help. I started with a behavioral optometrist. She did recommend Nate for vision therapy, but I was concerned there was more to it than retraining eyes.

So I took him to a neurodevelopmentalist. He was assessed and I was given hours of exercises/activities to do with him daily. We slogged through that for a couple of years until Nate quit on me. I do feel like it was a good program that gave Nate some things he was missing and was part of the puzzle, but it was hard and time-consuming. And no matter how good the program, if your child won't do it anymore you won't get results!

I was at a loss of where to turn next. I had heard good things about a program an old friend was running, but didn't know what educational therapy was or if it would help Nate. My husband and I met with the program director and diagnostician and felt it would be a good fit. Nate was tested, which took about a week of sessions. I'm sure costs vary, but ours was about $800. Happily, they allowed us to make payments! After we went over the results, Nate began going twice weekly for 80 min. educational therapy sessions.

I cannot say enough good about this approach for my son! The underlying principle is that the brain is "plastic" and changeable. We are not stuck with what we have now. We can retrain our brains to work better. Thinking clearly has made a huge difference for Nate in all areas of his life, not just academically. So worth the time, effort and money. You can read more about it and search for a therapist in your area here. (http://nild.org/parents.asp)

I am so grateful for this thread!! Gwen, I have an appt w/NILD on Friday. It sounds so promising but it is pricey. I would love to farm-out at least 1 service as I am feeling so overwhelmed hsing 2 dyslexic children. Teaching them takes up so much of my time! I met with NILD once for my 10 yo dd but then had my son tested too and wanted to wait on his results. I am trying to combine both of my children into the same session b/c otherwise we cannot afford it. They are trying to work with me so I am hoping it will work out.

I wanted to add that NILD if you have it in your area, works with a testing service and can offer special rates if you choose to use their services. My son's testing ended up being free b/c my insurance covered the amt the psychologist was going to charge ($175 vs. $1500 quoted privately). And actually, I have not signed up with them yet but have had my testing done. I am so glad to hear that your experience with them was positive!!:clap:

Jennifer in VA
04-24-2012, 01:09 PM
Have to chuckle a tiny bit. Believe Cori said she was going to blog the high lights of the thread so it was in one place for her later. This sounded like a really good idea and I've spent the last half hour just typing out our last 12 months, not including my overall concerns for Simon. I'm just now getting to rereading the whole thread and looking for the various suggestions on books, kits, and think there was some on nutriution too. My head is spinning with information right now. Have a feeling I may need to finish the post later.:lol:

Cori
04-25-2012, 06:28 PM
Glasses!!! Found out today that the boy needs glasses! He also has astigmatism that has gotten worse. I wonder if this will make a huge difference for him with reading?!

I know eyesight has nothing to do with memory issues.... He is remembering his birthday now so he might have been too tired that day I asked him. I also remember learning some memory tricks in school and we haven't tried those tricks yet. Trying to remember all of them. ha!

I've been wanting to encourage him with memory work so I had him give me a 7 number challenge on Monday. He wrote it down for himself, and I verbally learned it, never looking visually, and had him ask me again a while later. I got it. Then I had him ask me later that day and I almost got it (transposed two numbers).

When we got in the car today he said, "OK Mom, time for your test." And I happily tried it (modeling right lol). I transposed two numbers again. I said, wow it's really hard to learn 7 numbers. I'll have try some other tricks. I told him how I would run through the numbers as I thought of it the last few days...

Anyhow, he thought it was great fun. So we might make memory work more fun like this...

I borrowed it from a tip about narration. Try doing it yourself....and it IS hard. I'm really terrible at auditory learning. I'm more visual. Stepping outside of our own learning box is harder than you'd think...

Anyhow, I'm still watching for dyslexia. I'm not sweeping it under the rug. My husband doesn't want to do testing right now and I'll respect that and wait until 3rd grade like PS and see how he's doing. Or if he hits another brick wall...we'll see.

I've got those books on the way and I'm actually kind of excited about the ADVANTAGES that dyslexia brings. You know? I think we need to look at their strengths too. Everyone has gifts from God. Every child, every person. I truly believe that. I know none of us are discounting that in any way. Not one bit. We just want to help them do it all.

I keep thinking about that Einstein quote about judging a fish on his ability to climb a tree... and if the tree is reading, I'll put the tree in the water for my little fish. We homeschool, we can do it a different way.... and maybe this fish just needs glasses. We'll see!!

Thanks again everyone. I still plan to write that blog post with resources. It is still on my radar.

:hi: :group:

Gwen in Texas
04-25-2012, 09:10 PM
I am so glad to hear that your experience with them was positive!!:clap:

That sounds exciting, Shelley! And believe me, our experience has been beyond positive. Perfect thing at the perfect time for my boy. And for me!

One piece of our puzzle I didn't include in my earlier post was working with a christian counselor. Norma, your posts reminded me of this because one of his recommendations was that I not be *everything* in Nate's world. He needed me to be Mom. Someone else needed to address other needs in his life. He was right and educational therapy was part of the solution.

Let me know how things go!

Cori
04-26-2012, 08:03 AM
I found out about local dyslexia testing and it is $250. $400 if I want the written report to go with it. We also found out he could do vision therapy starting at $800...but I'm really disappointed with that doctor for not explaining it, she left for lunch without telling me our appt was over. :( She was talking so fast and I didn't get to ask questions. We did leave with a prescription for glasses. I ordered him lined bifocals yesterday and now I think I should get him progressive lenses, or just use them for reading. The increase in myopia is puzzling (from 25% to 41%) and they are trying to control the progression of myopia in children.

I might post about the eyes, and hopefully get a list of dyslexia resources together on the blog too. I'm not finding much support for my theory with my husband and friends. They think he's fine. Maybe he does just need glasses. Either way, it doesn't hurt to wait a bit longer. Try the glasses, do more research about his eyes and what to do for them. Pinhole glasses maybe?

Anyhow, someone asked for my blog and here it is.

http://wonderinthewoods.wordpress.com/2012/04/25/yarn-along-and-reading/

Not a great post about dyslexia, but maybe I will get that done soon. Thinking I should also limit screen time. I feel bad that screen time might have contributed to my son's myopia. He is laser focused when he gets to play on the computer or ipod. :unsure:

I'm really tired of feeling bad about decisions for our kids, like I could somehow control it all. I'm not in control. There are too many factors to feel like mom is responsible for ev.ery.thing. I'm going to pray and wait for some answers about this child. Specifically, I'm asking what to do about his eyes and what to do about possible dyslexia. I'm giving it all to God at this point.

Mary FL
04-26-2012, 06:20 PM
Cori, it IS so hard! :group: We understand. So grateful for this community within my favorite curriculum community! :thumb: