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Cori
05-05-2012, 03:14 PM
I think I've narrowed down my son's reading issues (without the benefit of testing). And I really believe his trouble is with decoding words while reading. He knows phonics and does well with something like the paint chip word family game. He gets them rapid fire but if you put the words in a book he's looking for meaning not phonics. (I guess)

He is also not very good at phoneme segmentation. He will often get it wrong the first time but then hears it when I correct him.

So, I'm here to ask again if there is a program, preferably on the computer, that can help with decoding? Is this just a need for more practice? His comprehension is good but I noticed he is doing the right brain traits for reading (see link).

http://applestars.homeschooljournal.net/resources/right-brained-resources/typical-right-brained-reading-traits/

Do you think Earobics will help? Or should I just be patient since he's in the 8 to 10 time frame on the link above?

He likes Reading Eggs and is progressing on that. The program says his reading level is for a 5.75 year old and he just tested and bumped up to a 6 yo. My 5 year old tests at 7 yo reading level. I know not to pay attention to these "ages" but it gives you and idea where he is at with a comfortable reading level without my help. Maybe he can't read 2nd grade since I'm helping him so much. I'll admit it is hard to see my almost 8.75 year old at a 5.75 yo reading level. I do believe they start too soon in PS so maybe add a year to that age?

I'm also having trouble narrowing down what to use from the longer thread. I don't have $400 right now for the dyslexia testing and his glasses come in next week. Now I think there is more to it than vision correction.

Some of you who have been in my shoes, would you just continue with the Reading Eggs (and reading together) since it's reasonably priced and then think about something specific for next school year (after September), perhaps after we get some testing done?

Thanks.

Esther-Alabama
05-05-2012, 03:30 PM
Where do you live? Have you heard of Scottish Rite Dyslexic centers? They are many, many places throughout the US and do dyslexic testing for free.

Also, if it were me and I had to do things over.....I would spend my time teaching things to my ds using a visual, auditory method, and hands on. Multisensory methods.

For instance, I taught him to read using letter magnets and a cookie sheet. He "built" words using the magnets and this helped to reinforce the learning in a different way than just reading the words and writing the words.

I teach spelling the same way, using letter tiles and All About Spelling curriculum.

To help with reading comprehension, reading fluency, and speed, I used a very simple, but effective method outlined in the book, Overcoming Dyslexia. First, I read a page in a reader that is his level or a little below. Then, he reads the same page back to me. If he stumbles on a word, I immediately help him and he continues. We have read 3-4 large chapter books this way, he hears the words first and then he reads them and he hears them, says them, and looks at them. I don't know why, but it helped more than anything else we have ever done. He said he learned to read "outloud in his head". I cannot explain what he means or what he was doing prior to that, but it helped.

Spending time on each word family, playing rhyming games and building words with magnets or alphabet blocks will help. I am a firm believer in multi sensory.

As far as helping to remember phoneme sounds and segmenting, I had good success with Dianne Crafts book Right Brain Phonics. It was cheap, took only a few minutes a day and was a solid method of decoding and learning phonemes.

TonyaP
05-05-2012, 04:11 PM
The "by, with, to" method helps develop fluency. There as program called "Reading Assistant" that will do this for you, I think. I saw it listed at homeschoolbuyerscoop.com.

Esther-Alabama
05-05-2012, 04:56 PM
The "by, with, to" method helps develop fluency. There as program called "Reading Assistant" that will do this for you, I think. I saw it listed at homeschoolbuyerscoop.com.

Yes, I was returning to tell you about this. This is a computer program that will do the technique I described of reading the passage to the child, then listening to them read, etc...

Lindsey Carter
05-08-2012, 10:37 PM
In the Verticy program that I am using with my kids one of the things that is helpful is drawing pictures and using visual aids. For example, when we learn a letter sound, we draw pictures or cut and past pictures of words with that sound in it. For blends we have made them out of oil and watched them blend together, taken cinnamon and sugar and stirred it to watch it blend together, etc. In my research a lot of the information is saying that dyslexics often think in pictures, so putting a picture with something they are trying to remember can be especially helpful.

Cori
05-09-2012, 10:37 AM
that's a great idea! Thanks!

My friend gave me this free website for free training and information on Orton Gillingham method, and I was wondering how I would make it "stick."

http://athome.readinghorizons.com/workshop/dip/workshop.aspx

My husband also came up with a great idea to get the boys to read. Now they get 10 minutes of screen time for every story or chapter they read. H is working through the Abeka books and some stories vary in length so it will average out if he is reading them in order. My youngest is doing Headsprout and reading the 40-80 tall books, so one book is one story. If I read a harder book or chapter to them, that also counts. A chapter book like The Magic Tree house is about 10 chapters and equal to about one movie. One chapter book for one movie, I can handle that! :)

We have a reading explosion in our house! Since yesterday afternoon they have read 22 stories! I also let go of my "push" to try to prepare the standardized test next year and my husband and I decided to put H back into the first grade abeka readers. I'm not rushing him anymore. We'll go over and over until it sticks.

I LOVE the idea of mixing cinnamon and sugar!!! That's so GREAT. We love that here. ;)

Cori
05-09-2012, 10:41 AM
Where do you live? Have you heard of Scottish Rite Dyslexic centers? They are many, many places throughout the US and do dyslexic testing for free.

Also, if it were me and I had to do things over.....I would spend my time teaching things to my ds using a visual, auditory method, and hands on. Multisensory methods.

For instance, I taught him to read using letter magnets and a cookie sheet. He "built" words using the magnets and this helped to reinforce the learning in a different way than just reading the words and writing the words.

I teach spelling the same way, using letter tiles and All About Spelling curriculum.

To help with reading comprehension, reading fluency, and speed, I used a very simple, but effective method outlined in the book, Overcoming Dyslexia. First, I read a page in a reader that is his level or a little below. Then, he reads the same page back to me. If he stumbles on a word, I immediately help him and he continues. We have read 3-4 large chapter books this way, he hears the words first and then he reads them and he hears them, says them, and looks at them. I don't know why, but it helped more than anything else we have ever done. He said he learned to read "outloud in his head". I cannot explain what he means or what he was doing prior to that, but it helped.

Spending time on each word family, playing rhyming games and building words with magnets or alphabet blocks will help. I am a firm believer in multi sensory.

As far as helping to remember phoneme sounds and segmenting, I had good success with Dianne Crafts book Right Brain Phonics. It was cheap, took only a few minutes a day and was a solid method of decoding and learning phonemes.

I picked up Overcoming Dyslexia and that book is helpful! I also have All About Spelling. I'll try to the cookie sheets too for manipulatives since I don't care for the tiles that came with AAS.

Right now we went back to the first grade Abeka, instead of pushing the 2nd grade abeka readers. So when we move up to 2nd grade, I can read it first and then let him.

Thanks!

Cori
05-09-2012, 10:41 AM
The "by, with, to" method helps develop fluency. There as program called "Reading Assistant" that will do this for you, I think. I saw it listed at homeschoolbuyerscoop.com.

I'll check this out too, thanks!

ShelleyW
05-10-2012, 07:59 AM
Cori, I was in your same situation 18 months ago. I am by no means an expert but did have my dd tested and the psychologist who diagnosed my dd set up several appts just for me to train me how to teach her. She specializes in dyslexia and trains teachers in our area on how to teach dyslexic kids. It is not my intent to sound preachy, I just want to share what she taught me b/c she was spot on.

If your ds is struggling with phoneme segmention that needs to be addressed before he will progress solidly in his reading. This is the reason most kids struggle with reading is poor phonemic awareness. We used Barton level 1 to do this and within 3-4 weeks both of my dyslexic kids had it down. Earobics works on the same things but is a little slower going but also much cheaper. After that is mastered you really need to use a reading program that is Orton Gillingham based. Some programs are really expensive (Barton) and some aren't. I chose to train myself b/c money is an issue. If you can get your hands on a teacher's manual - Recipe for Reading, Wilson Reading, Writing Road to Reading, Anna Gillingham's original manual are some that come to mind, you can train yourself by reading through it. Most of these are available through the library but I bought Recipe for Reading on Amazon for less than $20. The books go step by step to tell you how you need to structure a lesson and you can make all the materials yourself. Recipe for Reading is pretty reasonably priced. I got all the flashcards, 3 workbooks, the readers etc for less than $200 but I am working with 2 kids on 2 different levels. Wilson is even cheaper but much more involved and I wanted to simplify as much as possible.

One of the most important factors in finding the right program is just what Ester said, it must be multisensory. So while working on the computer is fine for certain tasks, he needs to also use his other senses to cement his phonics instruction. We use letter tiles, sand and shaving cream but there are lots of ways to do this. We also draw or make works out of clay. All of these are fun for my kids so it doesn't seem like work

One thing I found out too is that whether your ds is dyslexic or not, you would still use this method to teach a child struggling to read no matter what their reading disability is. That was comforting to me b/c I first had my dd tested and it was 6 months between when she was tested and my ds was tested. I didn't want him to just struggle along so I started working with him too while I waited to get him tested.

The hardest part for me in all of this is that these lessons are very time consuming. Between 45 - 60 minutes a day just on reading. We have shelved FIAR for the year and only do the 3 R's. I spoke to Dianne Craft about this and she told me this is what we needed to do. I am glad I listened b/c my dd (10) has gained 2 grade levels of reading this year and my son has gained 1. My dd is just about at grade level. I have neglected my oldest dd horribly which makes me feel really bad. (school-wise I mean) Dianne Craft told me to just let her read and do what I could, that she would be fine. You know what? She is. She has done a lot of work on her own and has progressed just as well as she would have if I had been progressing as usual. I know that God had a hand in all that b/c we can only do so much.

I am looking so forward to the fall b/c I now have 3 dc that can work together and I don't have to drag the 10 and 8 yo along compensating for their lack of reading skills b/c they are reading now. It has been a long year but I am so glad we sacrificed and got the job done.

Sorry for writing a book - I just feel so passionately about this. It is so hard to school these SN kids and those of us who have BTDT can help each other so much.

:group:

Cori
05-10-2012, 09:29 AM
Thank you Shelley. That's what I need to know in order to do this. I still feel overwhelmed when I think about the time commitments and the "pulling of teeth" so to speak to get my son to do it.

I am trying to get him tested. We either need to save the money or our charter might do it.

I see what you mean about dyslexia or not, struggling readers do need extra. And he needs practice with phoneme segmentation. OK I'll work on that first.

So helpful, thank you.